History of Lenawee County, Michigan - Book 2, Page 108



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MEMOIRS OF LENAWEE COUNTY BIOGRAPHICAL - CONTINUED
James A. Hunter has, through well directed efforts, gained prestige as one of the representative farmers and stock-growers of his native county, and is the owner of a well improved farm in Macon township. He is a scion, in both the paternal and maternal lines, of honored pioneer families of this county, and he himself is known as a citizen of utmost loyalty and public spirit. Mr. Hunter was born in Macon township, this county, April 24, 1853, and is a son of Stephen and Caroline (Osborn@) Hunter, the former of whom was born in England, in 1818, and the latter was a native of Seneca county, New York. Stephen Hunter was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth Hunter, the latter of whom passed her entire life in England. After her death her husband came to America, and in 1844, he came to Lenawee county, from New York state. Here he passed the remainder of his life and his death occurred in Macon township, in 1878. Stephen Hunter came to this county with his father, and had previously been a resident of Seneca county, New York, where the family located upon coming to America, and where he found employment on the farm of John H. Osborne. He was a young man of twenty-five years at the time of taking tip his abode in Lenawee county, and he was one of the sterling pioneers bf Macon township. He later purchased forty acres of land in that township, where he developed a good farm, upon which he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 1881. He was a man of probity and sterling character and ever held the esteem of all with whom he came in contact. His political allegiance was given to the Democratic party and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. They became the parents of six children: Hester A., Charles Wesley, James A., George Henry, William Judson, and Elizabeth. All of the children are living except William J., who died in 1881. The devoted. wife and mother was summoned to the life eternal in 1885. She was a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Easlick) Osborne, the former of whom was born in Seneca county, New York, and the latter in the state of Pennsylvania. Her parents came to Michigan and settled in Macon township, this county, in 1833, about four years prior to the admission of the state to the Union. Mr. Osborne purchased forty acres of heavily timbered land in Macon township, and here he developed a productive farm before he was summoned from the scene of life's activities. He died about the year 1865, and his wife survived him by about five years. His old homstead is a part of the farm now owned and occupied by his grandson, James A. Hunter, whose name initiates this article. James A. Hunter is indebted to the district schools of Macon township for his early educational training, and he was reared to manhood on the home farm, in whose work he continued to assist until he had attained to his legal majority. He has continued to devote his attention to agricultural pursuits during his independent career and through his own efforts has advanced to a position as one of the successful farmers of his native township. His homestead comprises 12o acres of most arable and productive land and is improved with excellent buildings and other modern appurtenances. The farm is devoted to diversified agriculture and stock-raising, and from his well directed endeavors the owner secures goodly returns each successive season. In politics Mr. Hunter is aligned as a loyal supporter of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor, but he has never had aught of ambition for public office of any kind. He is affiliated with the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Grange of Macon township. On Feb. 20, 1884, Mr. Hunter was united in marriage to Miss Ida Jane McDaniel, who was born in the village of Tecumseh, this county, Dec. 14, 1862, and who is a daughter of Harris and Fannie (Pomeroy) McDaniel, whose marriage was solemnized in the city of Adrian, this county, March 18, 1855. Both Mr. and Mrs. McDaniel were natives of the state of New York, where the former was born Feb. 8, 1830, and the latter Jan. 22, 1828. Upon coming to Lenawee county Mr. McDaniel lo'cated in the village of Tecumseh, and here he maintained his home for many years, while he followed his vocation of railroad engineer. He passed the closing years of his life in South Dakota, where he died May i4, 1885. His wife died April 24, 1898. They had three children-Mary, who is deceased; William Silas, who is a resident of Clinton, this county; and Ida Jane, who is the wife of Mr. Hunter, subject of this review. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Hunter were Silas and Amelia (Curtis) Pomeroy, the former of whom was born in Suffield, Conn., April 26, 1785, and the latter in Sharon, that state, Aug. 21, 1788. They were num-bered among the early settlers of Lenawee county, and here Mr. Pomeroy passed the residue of his life. His wife died in Washtenaw county, in 1868, having survived him for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have no children. Fred L. Riddle is one of the representative business men of his native city, Hudson, where he conducts a successful enterprise as a druggist and dealer in toilet articles, stationery, etc., and he is recognized as a young man of progressive ideas and distinctive public spirit. He was born in Hudson, March I8, 1878, and is a son of James S. and Mary (Jaques) Riddle, the former of whom was born near the city of Detroit, in Wayne county, Michigan, and the latter in the state of New York. Both families were early founded in America, and the genealogy of the agnatic line is traced back to the early Colonial era of our country's history. James S. Riddle was reared and educated in Wayne county, this state, and there learned the tailoring trade in his youth. As a young man of twenty years he came to Hudson and established himself in the work of his trade, and here he eventually built up a successful business as a merchant tailor. He continued to be actively identified with this line of enterprise in Hudson until his death, which occurred No. 22, 1878, only a few months after the birth of his son, Fred Leroy, whose name initiates this sketch. Two other sons, William and John, are deceased, and the only daughter is now a resident of Algonac, Mich. The widowed mother now resides in the home of her only living son, and is one of the revered and popular pioneer women of Hudson. Fred Leroy Riddle gained his early educational training in the excellent public schools of Hudson, though he initiated his business career while still attending school, since he was but eleven years of age when he assumed the dignity of a clerkship in the drug store of S. Van Etta & Son, of Hudson. He eventually entered the department of pharmacy in the University of Ohio, at Ada, where he completed the prescribed technical course and well equipped himself for the profession which he has since followed and in which he has met with marked success. After leaving the institution mentioned Mr. Riddle returned to Hudson, where for the ensuing nine years he was employed in the retail drug store of Wolcott & Letcher. He then passed about one year in a similar position at Mendon, this state, and he then found employment in a leading drug establishment in the city of Adrian, where he remained until 1899, when he returned to Hudson and entered into partnership with E. D. Clarke in the drug business. This alliance continued, under the firm name of Clarke & Riddle, until February, 19o5, when Mr. Riddle purchased his partner's interest, and he has since continued the enterprise in an individual way. His establishment is attractive and essentially modern in its appointments and equipment, and caters to a large and representative patronage. The success of the enterprise has rested not a little on the personal popularity of Mr. Riddle in his native city, where his circle of friends is circumscribed only by that of his acquaintances. While he has never had any desire to enter the arena of active or practical politics he gives a loyal support to the cause of the Democratic party. He is affiliated with the Adrian Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and he and his wife are affiliated with the Catholic church, in whose faith he was reared. On Feb. 22, igoo, Mr.- Riddle was united in marriage to Miss Anna Seymour, daughter of John and Ellen (Welch) Seymour, Qf Hudson, and they have a winsome little daughter, Mary Virginia, who 'was born Feb. 23, 1907. Reinhardt J. Petersen stands as a splendid representative of that sterling Scandinavian element which has contributed so valuable a contingent to the social makeup of our great American republic, and it has been his to attain to pronounced success in the country to which he came as a stranger and as the only representative of his family. He is now numbered among the leading florists of Southern Michigan and has his finely equipped conservatories and propagating grounds in the city of Hudson, where he has gained distinctive popularity and prestige as a progressive business man and loyal citizen. Mr. Petersen was horn in Rebe, Denmark, Aug. 8, 1878, and is a son of Peter and Angeline (Duborg) Petersen, both of whom are likewise natives of that beautiful country of the far Norseland. The father was born on the isle of Elsiga, and was reared and educated in his native land, where he received the most advanced training in military tactics. I-Ie is now a teacher in connection with governmental military affairs in Germany, where he and his wife have maintained their home for many years. They became the parents of nine sons and seven daughters, and eight of the number are still living. As already stated, the subject of this review is the only representative of the immediate family in America. Reinhardt J. Petersen secured his early educational discipline in Germany, to which empire his parents removed when he was a child. He was afforded the advantages of the gymnasium -corresponding to the high schools of the United States-at Tonden, and later became a student in the celebrated military academy at Kiel, where he was the youngest student enrolled at the time_ At the age of sixteen years he left school and enterd upon an apprenticeship to the business of floriculture. He was thus engaged for nearly three years, and, in accordance with the customs of the country, was compelled to pay for the instructions and experience which he thus received in connection with an art which is maintained at a very high standard in Germany. In 1897, when nineteen years of age, Mr. Petersen severed the ties which bound him to his home and family and courageously set forth to win his way in America. He landed in the port of New York and forthwith came to Detroit, Mich., where he remained about seven years, during which he was in the employ of leading florists and, not only supplemented his knowledge in regard to his chosen vocation, but also familiarized himself with the business methods and the language of his adopted country. In 19o4 he engaged in business for himself, remaining in Detroit for a short time and then disposing of his interests in the Michigan metropolis, after which he went to Dayton, Ohio, where he remained until 1907, in September of which year he established his present business in Hudson, where he has built 'up a large and flourishing business. He has erected a commodious and thoroughly modern green-house, and makes a specialty of the sale of cut flowers, which he sells at wholesale in many of the larger cities of Michigan. He has worked earnestly and indefatigably, and his reward is not less in the success he has gained than in the position which he holds in the confidence and regard of all with whom he has had dealings and all with whom he is personally acquainted in his home county. His political support is given to the Republican party; he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church, and he is a member of the American Florists' Association. On March 22, 1899, Mr. Petersen was united in marriage to Miss Melvina Steuernagel, who was born and reared in the Dominion of Canada, and they have five children-Earl, Catherine, Erma, Olive, and Grace.



James H. Dwyer left upon the civic and business annals of the city of Hudson a definite impress for good and he long stood as one of the representative citizens of Lenawee county, where the major portion of his life was passed. He continued his residence in Hudson until his death, which occurred July 21, 19o8, and his name is here held in lasting honor. James Henry Dwyer was horn at Seneca Falls, Seneca county, New York, Sept. 18, 1844, and was a son of Dennis and Johanna (Drew) Dwyer, both of whom were likewise natives of the old Empire State, where they were reared to maturity and where their marriage was solemnized. Dennis Dwyer was engaged in the general merchandise business in his native state for a number of years and in the middle of the '4os he came with his family to Lenawee county. He became one of the pioneer settlers of Hudson township, where he secured from the government a tract of heavily timbered land, which he reclaimed and developed into a duly productive farm. He and his wife continued to reside on the old homestead until their deaths, and of their children four attained to years of maturity. James H. Dwyer, the subject of this memoir, was a child at the time of the family removal to this county, and he was reared amidst the scenes and influences of the pioneer era. His early education was secured in the subscription and district schools of Hudson township, and while still a lad he began to assume his due quota of the work of the home farm. After leaving school he served a thorough apprenticeship to the trade of tinsmith, and thereafter he was employed as a journeyman at his trade for a few years. At the inception of the Civil war he showed his patriotism by tendering his services in defense of the Union. He enlisted as a private in a regiment of Michigan volunteers and made a record as a gallant and faithful soldier of the Republic. At the close of the war Mr. Dwyer established himself in the hardware and tinning business in Hudson, and a number of years later he retired from this enterprise and engaged in the grocery business. Later he was employed for a time at Clayton, this state, and after that was again engaged in the grocery business in Hudson. He finally became a traveling salesman, and as such was employed for a number of years, making an excellent record, and after retiring from this business he again established himself in the grocery trade in Hudson. With this line of enterprise he was thereafter identified during the remainder of his active career. He was a man who ever commanded popular confidence and esteem and his circle of friends was particularly wide. He was a Democrat in his political proclivities, was a communicant of the Catholic church, as is also his widow, and was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. On Aug. 25, 1865, Mr. Dwyer was united in marriage to Eliza A. Haggerty, who was born and reared in Michigan and who is a daughter of John and Eliza (Pet-den) Haggerty, who were honored pioneers of Washtenaw county, where the father became a successful farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Haggerty became the parents of six children, of whom three are living, as follows: Mrs. Charles Van Ess, of Hillsdale; William Haggerty, of Hillsdale ; and Mrs. J. H. Dwyer. In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Dwyer : Harry J., who was born Aug. I8, 1870, is a resident of California; Maude, who was born June 2, 1872, resides in Hudson, as does also Louise, who was born Feb. 24, 1877; and Florence, who was born Jan. 2, 188o, is now a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of Indiana.



James E. Kies is numbered among the successful farmers and stock-growers of Hudson township, and is a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of Michigan. He was born in Moscow township, Hillsdale county, Dec. 22, 1856, and is a son of John H. and Mary (Hunt) Kies, both natives of the state of New York, where the former was born Jan. 10, 1823, and the latter Jan. 25, 1828; they were married Dec. 4, 1846. John Harvey Kies was a child at the time of his parents' immigration from. New York to Michigan, and the family settled in Moscow township, Hillsdale county, in the early pioneer days. There he was reared to maturity, and his boyhood days were passed in working. on the home farm during the summer seasons and attending the primitive pioneer schools during the winter terms. After attaining to his legal majority he secured employment in a foundry in Hillsdale county. A few years later he purchased the property, upon which he made improvements, and after operating the plant for several years he disposed of the same, after which he was engaged in the blacksmith business, in which he made a specialty of manufacturing carriages and wagons. After conducting this enterprise for some time he sold out and purchased a farm in Hillsdale county. He gave his attention to the work and management of this homestead until about 1876, when he came with his family to Lenawee county and purchased a small farm in Hudson township. Two years later he disposed of the property and removed to the old homestead farm of Will Carleton, the well known poet, in the same township, and there he was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life. He died while on a visit in Ohio, his wife having preceded him by a number of years. They became the parents of three sons and three daughters : Clarence E., born Feb. 8, 1848; Emma J. born Feb. 28, 1853; James E., born Dec. 22, 1855; Clifton A., born Aug. 7, 1857; Eva, born Nov. 22, 1861; and Lena W., born Oct. 20, 1865. Of the number, Emma and Clifton are deceased. James Emmet Kies, the immediate subject of this sketch, ,vas reared to the life of the farm and secured his early educational training in the district schools of his native township. He continued to be associated with his father in farming operations until the death of the latter, and he still rents and operates the old Carleton farm of sixty acres, which is one of the fine farms of the county, and which is celebrated as having been the former home of Michigan's loved and admired poet, whose gentle humor and pathos have given him a secure place in the hearts of all who are familiar with his various works. Though not active in political affairs, Mr. Kies gives a loyal support to the cause of the Republican party, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church of Hudson. On June 22, 1goo, Mr. Kies was united in marriage to Miss Susie Totten, daughter of Osgood and Olivia (Sherman) Totten, well known residents of Hillsdale township, Hillsdale county, this state. Mr. Totten was born in Monroe county, Ohio, in 1836, and his wife was born in the state of New York. Both are living, as are also their five children-Hattie, Jay, Darius, Cora, and Susie. Mr. and Mrs. Kies have no children.



Lucius Lilley has for more than fifty years been prominently identified with the -financial interests of Lenawee county in general and the village of Tecumseh in particular, and his long and useful life is a fine illustration of what may be accomplished by integrity, perseverance and resolution. Starting upon his independent career when but a youth of seventeen years, he gradually worked his way up until he became the conservator of important affairs, and,Lenawee county has been the field of his successful operations. Lucius Lilley was born in Homer, Cortland county, New York, April 21, -1823, and he is a direct descendant of Capt. Reuben Lilley, who was born at Brimfield, Mass., Feb. 14, 1745, and served with distinction as a captain of Colonial troops during the Revolutionary war. Zenas Lilley. (first) was the son of Capt. Reuben Lilley, and was also born at Brimfield, Mass., the date of his nativity being November 17, 1769. Zenas Lilley (second), son of Zenas Lilley (first) and grandson of Capt. Reuben Lilley, was born July 29, 1799, and in early manhood entered a tract of government land in Cortland county, New York, where he became one of the pioneer settlers. He married Miss Sarah Burke, April 18, 1822, and Lucius Lilley, the honored Lenawee county citizen, was the first born of that union. The family remained in their country home in the Empire State until 1834, when a removal was made to Ohio, and there the father again purchased a pioneer farm and entered upon the process of its reclamation from a state of nature. The son, Lucius, remained with his father until 1840, and then started out in life for himself, going first to Akron, Ohio, and subsequently to Cleveland. At the last named place in the spring of 1844, he became a clerk in the mercantile establishment of P. M. Weddell & Company, well known throughout Northern Ohio, and there he remained until 1847. He had commenced as the youngest clerk in the store and gradually worked his way upward until at the time of the death of Mr. Weddell, in 1847, young Lilley had been head clerk for a period of two years. He assisted in the closing tip of the large estate of his employer and the following year purchased a half interest in the Weddell House, at that time one of the largest and finest hotels in the West. There were no railroads, telegraph lines or street cars in Cleveland at that time. Mr. Lilley continued as manager of this hotel property until 1853,, at which time he was appointed agent for the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana steamboat line, running steamers between Cleveland and Toledo, and the following year he went to Buffalo, where he was 'employed in the general ticket office of the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana (now Lake Shore) Railroad Company. Subsequently he was transferred to the company's office in Adrian, and thus was brought about his introduction to Lenawee county, where 'he has lived so long, and where he has been so prominently identified with affairs especially in the building up of the village of Tecumseh and bringing into existence some of its most noteworthy institutions. In September, 1855, he engaged in the banking business in Tecumseh, accepting the position of teller in the old Tecumseh Bank, with which institution he remained until it wound up its affairs, in 186o. He then organized the Savings Bank of P. Bills & Company, Mr.Bills being the president and Mr. Lilley the cashier. In 1865 this bank was reorganized as the National Bank of Tecumseh, and Mr. Lilley held the position of cashier, managing its affairs successfully until it went into voluntary liquidation, in the spring of 1874. As a successor to this institution, the Bank of Bills, Lilley & Company was then organized, and Mr. Lilley was cashier and manager of the same until the death of Mr. Bills, in 188o, when a reorganization took place under the firm name of Lilley, Bidwell & Company, of which he was president and manager. The institution was again reorganized under the state banking law, Jan. 26, 1893, as the Lilley State Bank of Tecumseh, and Mr. Lilley has continued to serve as president tip to the present time. Thus in brief is given the story of an active life in the financial circles of Southern Michigan. While a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, on Feb. 18, 1848, Mr. Lilley was married to Miss Sarah McEachron, who was born in Nova Scotia, Feb. 5, 1829, and came to Cleveland with her mother in 1835. Her parents were Malcolm and Sarah McEachron, and the family is of Scotch an-cestry, possessing all the substantial and reliable traits of that nationality. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Lilley were born two children-James Raynor and Julia G. Frank M. Childs, who is one of the representative farmers of his native county, is the owner of a fine homestead in Hudson township, and there he now makes a specialty of dairy farming, in which his operations have been attended with distinctive success. He is a member of one of the honored pioneer families of the county and as a citizen he has ever upheld the prestige of the name which he bears. Frank Marion Childs was born in Hudson township, this county, Nov. 30, 1849, and is a son of Augustus W. and Amytis (Warner) Childs, the former of whom was born at Seneca Castle, N. Y., and the latter at Phelps, that state. Augustus W. Childs was reared to maturity in the old Empire State, where he received such educational advantages as were afforded in the common schools of the locality and period. After leaving school he served an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, in which he became a skilled artisan, and he continued in the work of his trade in New York state until he attained to his legal majority. In 1836, about a year before the admission of Michigan to the Union, he came to Lenawee county and numbered himself among the pioneers of Hudson township, where he took up a tract of government land. He forthwith initiated the arduous task of reclaiming his land from the forest, and the frame house which the erected on his homestead Was the first of the kind to be built in this section, where the other pioneers found domicile in the log houses common to the period. He found much requisition for his services as a carpenter, and in this vocation he was employed a portion of his time for many years. It may be stated incidentally that he assisted in the erection of the first large warehouse in Hudson and also the old grist mill at Palmyra, this county. He became a man of influence in the community, where he manifested deep interest in public affairs. He was endowed with fine mentality and was well fortified in his convictions, so that he was well fitted for leadership in local affairs. The high esteem in which he was held was shown in his being called upon to serve in various local offices of trust, and he was a member of the legislature of the state for one term in the early days. He .:spoused the cause of the Republican party at the time of its organization and thereafter continued a stalwart 'advocate of its principles and policies. He was a consistent member of the Congregational church, as is also his widow, who now resides in the home of her son, Augustus 0., in Redland, Cal., and who is eighty-seven years of age at the time of this writing, in 1909. Augustus W. Childs was called to the life eternal, July 10, 1890, and his name is held in lasting honor in the county to whose civic and industrial upbuilding he contributed in so large a measure. He and his wife became the parents of three sons and three daughters, all of whom are living and established in homes of their own. Augustus O. resides in California, as already intimated; Charles T. is a resident of Portland, Ore., and the daughters, all of whom are married, are Dora A., Grace M., and Jennie. Frank M. Childs, the immediate subject of this sketch, was reared tinder the influences of the middle pioneer days in Hudson township, where his preliminary educational discipline was secured in the district schools. He supplemented this training by a course in the high school in the village of Hudson. During his boyhood and youth he contributed his quota to the work of the home farm, and after leaving school, at the age of eighteen years, he continued to be associated in the management of the old homestead. until 1882, when he purchased his present fine farm of 13o acres, located in Hudson township. He has made the best of improvements on the place and has ever been known as a progressive and reliable business man. He gave his attention to diversified agriculture and stock-growing until 19o7, since which year he has found it expedient and profitable to devote his attention more especially to dairy farming, in which he has the best of facilities and the most approved sanitary provisions. His farm is one of the model places of the township and here he is held in much esteem. He takes a lively interest in public affairs of a local nature and while he has never desired public office of any order he is a staunch advocate and supporter of the cause of the Republican party. He and his wife are valued and active members of the Congregational church in the village of Hudson, and he has served continuously as one of its deacons since 1898. He is affiliated with the Hudson Township Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and with the Independent Order of Foresters. On Aug. 22, 1883, Mr. Childs was united in marriage to Miss Abbie A. Colton, daughter of Rev. Theron and Jennie (Harwood) Colton, of Hudson. Mr. Colton entered Yale University from New Haven, Conn., his native state, and in due time was graduated in this old and historic institution. Later he completed a theological course and was ordained to the ministry of the Congregational church. He held pastoral charges in New York state for some time and in 1875 came thence to Hudson, where he was pastor of the Congregational church until 1884. He died March 10, 1896, and his cherished and devoted wife passed away April 5, 1900. Of their six children four are living. In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Childs :. Theron W., who was born April 28, 1887, is a member of the class of 1911 in the literary department of the University of Michigan; Francis, who was born Sept. 16, 1891, is attending the Hudson High School ; and Philip, who was born Sept. 23, 1896, is a student in the well conducted school of his home district.



David C. Buck, the efficient and popular supervisor of Hudson township, has been a resident of Lenawee county for nearly twoscore years, and is one of the representative citizens and progressive farmers of the township mentioned. His well improved homestead is located in section 2o and comprises eighty acres. He has been continuously incumbent of the office of township supervisor for more than a decade, and this fact alone offers adequate voucher as to the confidence and esteem in which he is held in the community. David Clyde Buck was born at Harpersfield, Delaware county, New York, April 17, i84i,-and is a son of Alanson and Abigail (Fuller) Buck, the former of whom was likewise a native of Harpersfield, and the latter was born at Spencer, Mass. Alanson Buck was born Aug. 2, 1815, and was reared and educated in his native state, where his parents settled in an early day. Tne family was founded in New England in the Colonial era of American history, and the paternal grandfather of Alanson Buck was a valiant soldier in the Continental line during the War of the Revolution, in which he served in the office of major. Alanson Buck was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm, and that at a time when farming was not conducted under the favorable conditions that obtain in this Twentieth century. His life was one of consecutive industry and such measure of success as came to him was the result of his own ability and efforts. His integrity was inviolable and thus he merited and received the implicit confidence and esteem of his fellow men. He continued to reside on his old homestead farm in Delaware county, New York, until his death, which occurred June 15, 1871, and his wife passed away March 21, 1878. They became the parents of one son and two daughters, and the latter are both deceased-Mrs. Emily Seeley, and Mrs. Sarah Jane Maynard. Thus the subject of this review is now the only surviving member of the immediate family. David, C. Buck has reason to know and appreciate the dignity of honest toil and endeavor, for with the same he has been familiar from his boyhood days. Even as he has been the architect of his own fortunes as one of the world's workers, so has his educational training been largely one of self-discipline and experience, for in his youth his school attendance in his native state did not compass in its entirety more than two years. Through reading and through association with men and affairs he has, however, made good the handicap of his youth. At the age of nine years he left school and thereafter he found ample demand upon his time and attention in connection with the work of the home farm, in which he continued to be associated until he was about twenty-six years of age. He then took an important step, in that he married, and after this responsibility had been assumed he settled on a farm in his native county. He was there engaged in general farming a few years, and then he purchased a portion of his father's old homestead, where he continued to reside until 1872, when he sold his interest in the property and came with his family to Lenawee county. Here he purchased his present farm, to whose improvement and cultivation he has given his attention until it now ranks as one of the best places of Hudson township. His advancement on the tip-grade of independence and definite prosperity has been gained by earnest and well directed effort, and he has so ordered his course as to command at all times the high regard of those with whom he has come in contact in the various relations of life. In politics Mr. Buck is a stanch advocate of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor, and he has long been prominent in public affairs of a local order. He served two years as justice of the peace, was school treasurer for his township for a period of twenty-eight years, and since 1898 he has served consecutively as township supervisor. In this office his course has been marked by conservatism and yet by legitimately progressive ideas. so that he has aided materially in conserving a wise administration of county affairs. The popular appreciation of his efforts is best attested by his long tenure of office. He is a man of broad and liberal views and is tolerant in his judgment. On Jan. 2, 1867, Mr. Buck was united in marriage to Mi"ss Armenia A. Bangs, daughter of Lemuel S. and Samantha (Foote) Bangs, who were honored pioneers of Adams township, Hillsdale county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Buck are the parents of three children. Austin A., who was born March 29, 1868, is now a resident of the village of Hudson, and is one of the most extensive buyers and shippers of live stock in the state; Lelia, who was born Aug. 11, 1876, and Heman, who was born in July, 1886, remain at the parental home.



Matthew Burt, whose fine dairy. farm is located in Hudson township, is one of the progressive and highly esteemed citizens of the county, and has resided on his present homestead for nearly thirty years. He was born in Ransom township, Hillsdale county, Michigan, April 9, 1846, and is a son of Thomas and Sarah (Bartlett) Burt, both natives of Dorsetshire, England. Thomas Burt was born in i8o5, and was reared and educated in his native county, where he learned the trade of baker when a young man. He was engaged in the work of his trade in England until 1833, when he came to America and located near Toledo, Ohio. Two years later he returned to England, where his wife and three children had remained in the interim, and in 1838 he came with his family to the United States and settled in Ransom township, Hillsdale county, Michigan. There he reclaimed a farm from the virgin forest, and there both he and his devoted wife passed the remainder of their lives, secure in the esteem of all who knew them and numbered among the sterling pioneers of the county. Thomas Burt died Feb. 14, i88o, and his wife was summoned to eternal rest at the venerable age of ninety-three years, Feb. 15, 1895. They became the parents of eight children: Sarah, Edward, Thomas, James, Betsey, Nancy, George, and Matthew, all of whom are living except the first mentioned, who died in May, 19o7. Sarah, Edward and Thomas were born in England and the other children 'were born in Hillsdale county. The father accumulated a fine landed estate and was, one of the successful farmers and representative citizens of Ransom township. Matthew Burt, the immediate subject of this review, passed his boyhood and youth on the old homestead farm in Hillsdale county, and after completing the curriculum of the district schools of Ransom township, he continued his studies in the union school in the city of Hillsdale, which was then a mere village. At the age of sixteen years he left school and for a short time thereafter he worked on the home farm. He then came to Hudson, where he entered upon an apprenticeship at the blacksmith's trade, and after becoming duly skilled in this ancient handicraft, he returned to his native county and opened a shop of his own at Ransom Center. He built up a prosperous business, in which he continued for a period of four years, at the expiration of which he rented his father's fine homestead farm of 360 acres, which he operated for a period of eight years. In the meanwhile, however, the Civil war had been in progress, and it had been his to tender his aid in defense of the Union. On Dec. 24, 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company G, Thirtieth Michigan infantry, and with this command the continued to serve until 'the close of the war. He received his honorable discharge June 17, 1865. His elder brothers, James and Edward, were likewise valiant soldiers in the Civil war, as members of Michigan and Ohio regiments. In i88o Mr. Burt left his father's farm and removed to Lenawee county. Here he purchased 168 acres, in section 30, Hudson township, where he has since maintained his home and where he is now successfully engaged in general farming and dairying. To the latter department of his farm enterprise he gives especial attention, operating distributing wagons and having a representative patronage on his milk -route in the city of Hudson. His dairy accessories are of the most approved modern type, and he maintains the highest sanitary standard in all parts of the dairy work. He has made many substantial improvements on his farm, which is one of the attractive and valuable homesteads of Hudson township. In politics Mr. Burt is not dominated by partisanship, but gives his support to the measures, policies and candidates meeting the approval of his judgment. He is affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic and he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. On Dec. 18, 1869, Mr. Burt was united in marriage to Miss Mary Powers, daughter of Oliver T. and Elvira (Cunningham) Powers, of Ransom township, Hillsdale county. In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the children of this union- Elizabeth is the widow of Frank G. Martin, of Hudson ; Elias is engaged in the milk business in Hudson; Anna is the wife of John Bavin, of Hudson; Kile C. is engaged in the dray business in Hudson; Thomas P. is associated with his father in the work and management of the home farm; and James died Sept. 8, 1902. George S. Goodnow, whose home was in Hudson at the time of his death, held a secure place in the confidence and esteem of the people of this community and was known as an able business man and a loyal and public-spirited citizen. He left a record that _ is unblemished and it is fitting that in this volume be accorded to him a memorial tribute, brief though it must needs be. George Simeon Goodnow was born at Webster, N. Y., April 20, 1828, and was a son of Simeon and Sally Goodnow, both natives of the state of New Hampshire. Si meon Goodnow was a prosperous farmer in New York for many years and there both he and his wife continued to reside until their deaths. He passed to the life eternal Nov. 18, 1838, and his wife survived him by more than thirty years, as her death occurred June 27, 1872. George S. Goodnow gained his early educational training in the district schools of his native county, and was reared to maturity on the home farm, to whose work he early began to contribute his quota. He was but ten years of age at the time of his father's death, and thereafter he continued to assist in the work and management of the home farm until he had attained to his legal majority, when he went to the city of Rochester, N. Y., where he engaged in the grocery business, in which he continued for a few years. He finally sold the business and for a number of years thereafter he conducted a prosperous enterprise in the handling of farm produce. His next occupation was that of traveling representative for a leading nursery in Rochester, a city which still retains a specially high reputation in this line of enterprise, and after being thus engaged for a term of years, he came to Michigan. In the Centennial year of our national independence--1876-he took up his residence in Hudson, which place represented his home during the major portion of his life thereafter. For some time he resided in Chicago, where he was an active member of the board of trade, and in 1883 he went to South Dakota, in connection with business affairs, being there seized with the illness which terminated in his death Aug. 24, 1883. He was a man of impregnable integrity and honor, of strong_ individuality and broad mental ken, and in connection with the practical activities of life he gained a success worthy of the name. Though essentially public-spirited, and one who took a lively interest in the questions and issues of the hour, he was never active in the arena of politics, in which connection his support was given to the Republican party. He was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and was a consistent member of the Baptist church, of which Mrs. Goodnow also has long been a devoted member. On April 3, 1861, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Goodnow to Miss Mary Phillips, daughter of John and Permilla (Wood) Phillips, of Webster, Monroe county, New York, which was also his native place. Mr. Phillips was engaged in mercantile pursuits in his native state for many years, and in the early '6os he removed with his family to Michigan. He settled in Hillsdale county, where he was engaged in farming until 1877, when he removed to the village of Hudson, Lenawee county, where his death occurred Aug. iS, 18go. His wife passed away Sept. 7, 1863, aged fifty-six years. They became the parents of nine children, of whom four are living. Of the two children of Mr. and Mrs. Goodnow it may be recorded that Horace, who was born Aug. a7, 1863, is now a traveling salesman and maintains his home in the city of Detroit; Alice P., who was born Aug. 1g, 1866, died in the bloom of her gracious young womanhood, having been summoned to the life eternal Jan. 15, 1885. Since the death of her honored husband, Mrs. Goodnow has retained her residence in Hudson, where she has an attractive home and where she is surrounded by a wide circle of devoted friends.



Dewey W. Rhead, who is one of the successful farmers and dairymen of Hudson township, where he is also serving in the office of justice of the peace, is a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Michigan, and as a citizen and business man he has added to the prestige of the name which he bears. He was born in Nankin township, Wayne county, Michigan, Feb. 2, 1869, and is a son of Robert D. and Jane (Robinson) Rhead, the former of whom was born in the city. of Albany, N. Y., in 1818, and the latter was likewise born in the old Empire State. Robert D. Rhead was reared to the life of the farm and received his education in the common schools of his native state, where he remained until he had attained to the age of eighteen years, when, in 1836, he came to Michigan in company with his brother, Aden. They became associated in the, purchase of a tract of land in Wayne county, and together initiated the work of reclaiming and otherwise improving the property, of which Robert D, eventually became the sole owner, through the purchase of the interest of his brother. He developed a productive farm and was one of the influential and popular citizens of Wayne county. In connection with the management of his farm he conducted a hotel in the village of Plymouth for a period of about three years, at the expiration of which he exchanged the hotel property for a farm near the same village. On the farm last mentioned he continued to reside until 188o, when he removed to Lenawee county and settled in Hudson, where he assumed control of the Comstock Hotel, for which property he traded his farm. He continued in the ownership and management of the hotel until 1891, when he exchanged the property for a well improved farm in Hillsdale county. This property he later sold and he then purchased a farm of 115 acres in section 7, Hudson township, where he passed his declining days. He died in October, 1898, secure in the esteem and good will of all who knew him and leaving a record untarnished in every respect. He was twice married, and two children were born of the first union. The subject of this review is the only child of the second marriage, and his widowed mother is a cherished member of his household. Dewey W. Rhead secured the major portion of his earlier educational training in a private school and later continued his studies in the school at Plymouth and the high school at Hudson, after which he completed a course in the Detroit Business University. After leaving this institution he was employed for one year in the freight office of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railroad, at Hudson, and he then went to the city of Chicago, where he became shipping clerk in the extensive establishment of the Columbus Dry Goods Company. He was thus engaged for one year, at the expiration of which he returned to Hudson, and assumed charge of his father's farm, in the ownership of which he is associated with his mother and to the supervision of which he has since given his attention. He has made many improvements on the homestead, including the erection of a fine modern residence, which he completed in 19o6, and the farm, which is located only a short distance to the north of the corporate limits of the city of Hudson, is one of the model places of this section of the county, as thrift and prosperity are in evidence on every side. Mr. Rhead is engaged in diversified agriculture and stock-raising, and makes a specialty of the dairy department of his farm enterprise. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party, in whose faith he was reared, and he is a potent factor in local affairs of a public order. In 19o3 he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, and in the election of 1907 he was chosen as his own successor-a circurnstance that clearly denotes popular appreciation of his administration of the affairs of the office. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and with its adjunct, the Pythian Sisters, of which latter Mrs. Rhead also is a member, and both of them attend the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Hudson. Their beautiful home is a center of generous and refined hospitality and their circle of friends is circumscribed only by that of their acquaintances. On Aug. 28, Igoi, Mr. Rhead was united in marriage to Miss Anna M. Corser, daughter of George W. and Mettie (Bryant) Corser, of Hudson township, and of this union has been begotten one child, Robert, who was born April 17, 1903. George M. Dutt, M. D., is an able and popular representative of the medical profession in Lenawee county, and is established in the successful practice of medicine and surgery in the city of Hudson, where he succeeded to the business of Dr. Nix. He is specially well fortified in all departments of his profession, is a close student and keeps constantly in touch with the advances made in the dual sciences which his profession exploits. Dr. Dutt was born at Granville, Kent county, Michigan, Sept. 26, 1862, and is a son of Philip and Catherine (Kiefer) Dutt. His father was born at Easton, Pa., July 4, 183o, and was reared and educated in the old Keystone State, where he learned the trade of cabinet-making in his youth. His wife likewise was born in Pennsylvania, where their marriage was solemnized, and in 1850 they came to Michigan and took up their abode in the village of Granville, where he established himself in business -as a carpenter and building contractor. In this connection he did a large amount of excellent work, and contributed more largely than perhaps any other one person to the upbuilding of the village, through his operations as a contractor. He there continued to maintain his home for many years and he then purchased a farm near Lowell, Kent county, where he continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in February, 1891. He was a man of unswerving probity and honor and ever commended the confidence and esteem of those with whom he came in contact in the various relations of life. His political allegiance was given to the Democratic party and he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his widow, who now maintains her home with her daughter, Iva, in Ionia county, this state. All of the five children-survive the honored father, and their names are here entered in the respective order of their birth : Emma, Iva, Andrew. George M., arld Fred. Dr. George M. Dutt was reared to maturity in his native county, in whose district schools he secured his preliminary educational discipline, after which he continued his studies in the high school at Lowell, in which he was graduated at the age of sixteen years. He thereafter completed a course in the Swensberg Business College, in the city of Grand Rapids, and in preparation for the work of his chosen and exacting profession he was soon afterward matriculated in the Bennett Medical College, in the city of Chicago, in which he duly completed the prescribed technical course, and was graduated as a member of the class of 1887. He received from this well known institution his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine, and forthwith established himself in the active work of his profession at White Pigeon. Later he followed his profession at other places in Michigan, and also in Indiana. In 1896 he came to Hudson and succeeded to the practice of Dr. Nix, and through his professional ability and personal popularity he has built tip a large and representative practice in this section of the county. In 19oS the Doctor was graduated in the National College of Electrical Therapeutics, at Lima, Ohio, and since that time he has availed himself specially of the most modern electrical appliances and systems in the treatment of certain classes of disease. . In the spring of lgog he installed in his offices a fine outfit for the treatment of certain pathological conditions and disorders by the application of electric light, and this apparatus is the only one of its kind in Lenawee county. Through his technical knowledge and personal experience, as well as through the results attained by other practitioners, Dr. Dutt is deeply appreciative of the value of electricity in connection with medical practice, and he is enthusiastic in this department of his professional work, though he never permits himself to overstep the bounds of due conservatism. The Doctor is surgeon for the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railway and is a member of the Tri-State Medical Society, whose membership is drawn from the states of Michigan, Ohio and Indiana, and while a resident of Indiana he was president of the Northern In-diana Medical and Surgical Society. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of the World, the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, and is medical examiner for the local organization of the Modern Woodmen. His political proclivities are indicated in the fact that he gives his support to the cause of the Republican party, but he has never been active in the field of practical politics. He and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. On Sept. 27, 1887, Dr. Dutt was united in marriage to Miss Georgiana H. Sweetman, daughter of John and Susana (Varian) Sweetman, of Edgerton, Ohio, and the children of this union are Benlah, John, George and Thelma, all of whom remain at the parental home.

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History of Lenawee County
published by The Western Historical Society in 1909. Book 1
Book 2

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