History of Lenawee County, Michigan - Book 2, Page 112



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MEMOIRS OF LENAWEE COUNTY BIOGRAPHICAL - CONTINUED
George H. Marshall,. a prosperous farmer of Devil's Lake, Lenawee county, is a native of the Empire State, born in Ulster county, Oct. 12, 1822, the son of David and Margaret (Mance) Marshall, also natives of New York. George H., of this review, received his educational training in the schools of his native county and was united in matrimony to Miss Julia A. Scott, daughter of Rufus R. and Eliza (Nash) Scott, who for many years were residents of Kansas. In 1849, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall migrated to Michigan and settled on a farm of forty acres in the township of Woodstock, this county. He has always gained his livelihood by tilling the soil and is an enthusiastic follower of his calling. In politics he is an ardent champion of the Democratic party, though he has never been a seeker after public office, believing that the office should seek the man rather than the man the office. Mr. Marshall is a liberal as regards his religious views and is affiliated with no particular church society. Six children have graced the fire-side of this worthy couple-Rufus, an unmarried man, resides on the parental farm; Eliza, the wife of Norman Andus, is the mother of two children and a resident of the state of Missouri; Charles S. is deceased; Mary is Mrs. Byron Harlow, of the state of Washington, and the mother of three children; Egbert, and George H., Jr. In 1903, the fireside of the Marshall home was darkened by the shadow of the death angel and Mrs. Marshall was summoned to her reward, leaving her devoted husband and five children to mourn her loss. She was ever a kind and considerate wife and mother and the entire community in which she resided lamented her untimely taking away.



Andrew Burke, a popular .young agriculturist of the township of Woodstock, is a native of Germany, born Sept. 26, 1876, a son of Martin and Mary (Ruoff) Burke, also natives of Germany. The father and mother were born in Wurttemberg, and were married there. They became the parents of eleven children, ten of whom are living and reside in the United States. The father immigrated to America about 1883, landing in New York city and coming directly to Woodstock township, where he purchased the farm upon which the subject of this review resides today, and which the father continued to operate and reside on up to the time of his demise, in 1898. After coming to this country he was ever a staunch adherent of the Democratic party, though never a seeker of public office, and though he was an active member of the German Lutheran church while a resident of the Fatherland„ he did not take out his church papers after coming to the United States. Andrew Burke, to whom this review, is dedicated, received his schooling in the district schools of Woodstock, dividing his early days between the school room and his father's farm, and at a tender age he learned the lesson of self-dependence. As he has resided upon a farm during the greater portion of his days he has' practically been reared in the agricultural industry. He knows the "ins and outs" of the business "from A to Z," and has been very successful as a follower of this, his chosen calling. He is liberal in his religious views and has never allied himself with any denomi-nation. In. politics, like his respected sire, he is a loyal member of the -Democratic party and has never aspired to public office. Mr. Burke has never taken unto himself a wife, preferring the blissful-ness and blessedness of bachelorhood to the trials and uncertainties of matrimony. His mother, now in her sixty-eighth year, is making her home with him and is not in the best of health.



Edward S. Pearson, a prominent and influential farmer of Woodstock, is a native of that township, born July 6, 1851, on section 27. His father, john Pearson, -was a native of Yorkshire, England, born in 1817, and came to America with his parents while still in his early youth, landing at a Canadian port after a rough and tedious voyage of nine weeks. For a time he was employed in New York state by Wadsworth, the famous lumberman, who had escaped from France with some of Bonaparte's money. From New York the family came direct to Lenawee county and located on eighty acres of government land in the township of Woodstock, where John Pearson resided for nearly forty years and died May 19, 1866. He was ever a loyal member of the Republican party from the birth of the organization up to the time, of his demise. The mother of Edward S., of this review, was born in the vicinity of Shepherdswell, England, in July, 181g, and passed away Jan. 7, 1892. There were eleven children in the family: Joseph died in his early youth and the names of the others are: Rhoda, Elizabeth, Annie, Theresa, Robert, Josephine, Zella, Lincoln, George, and Edward S., of this sketch. The last named acquired his educational training in the district schools of Woodstock and has always followed agricultural pursuits, in which he has been very successful. In politics he has been affiliated with the Republican party for years, and for three terms he was a member of the board of review in his township. For more than thirty years he has been affiliated with the Baptist church, in the affairs of which he is an active and enthusiastic participant, and he is also a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, termed the Grange in .common parlance, having belonged to this order since 1875. George A. Ellsworth, a prominent and influential 'farmer of Woodstock, is a native of that township, having been born on the old Ellsworth homestead, July 12, 1855. His father, Alexander Ellsworth, was born in Pennsylvania in 1811, and in his young manhood removed to the Empire State, where he was united in marriage to his first wife-Lydia Hand. In 1837 they migrated to Lenawee county and took up eighty acres of government land, which now comprises a portion of the farm on which the subject of this review now resides. The father cleared the timber and undergrowth from a_portion of his claim and at the same time followed his trade as a gunsmith, but on the death of his young wife a few years later he returned to New York state. Here he made the acquaintance of Jane Lamphere, whom he subsequently married, Oct. 13, 1838, and the same year they migrated to Michi-gan, where the father again took up eighty acres of government land in Woodstock township, on which. he continued to make his domicile until his death, Jan. 27, 1864. Jane (Lamphere) Ellsworth, the mother of George A., of this sketch, was born in the Empire State, Oct. 12, 1825, daughter of Stacy and Mary (Barnham) Lamphere, and today at the ripe age of eighty-four she is hale and hearty. Her father was born in Vermont and her mother in Reading, near the Vermont line. Mrs. Ellsworth is one of eight children, all of whom are deceased except herself and a sister, Mrs. Francis Thomas, who resides in Buffalo, N. Y. Nine children were born to Alexander Ellsworth and wife: Charles, deceased, was married to Mary Patterson and resides in WWroodstock; Lydia, also deceased, was the wife of Joseph,Dailey and died at her home in California; Warren, deceased, was wedded to Mary Ann Mosher and expired at the home of George A. Ellsworth, in Woodstock township, May 24, 19o4; Albert, deceased, was the husband of Laura E. Wait and passed away at his residence in the state of California; Mary married Giles Salsbury, of Rome twonship, now deceased, and she is the present wife of David Smith, a resident of the township of Rome, this county; Etta is wedded to John Ryan and- lives in the same township; Alice is the wife of George Burroughs and resides in Tecumseh; Hannah is married to John Stevens, and is also a resident of Rome township; and George A., is the subject of this record. Eliza Ellsworth, a daughter of Alexander Ellsworth by his first wife, passed away in 19o4, aged sixtyeight years, the wife of John Patterson. The subject of this review was reared on the old Ellsworth farm on the bank of Devil's Lake, and he acquired his education in the district schools of Woodstock township. Farming has always been his chief occupation, though for two years he was deputy-sheriff of this county. Politically he has always been an active and enthusiastic member of the Democratic party, but has not acquired the habit of seeking public office. Concerning religious matters he entertains liberal Views, and though a believer in the fundamental teachings of Christianity he is not affiliated with any particular. congregation. On Aug. 14, 1873, he was united in. matrimony to Eva Ryan, daughter of John and Jane Ryan, both deceased, who were residents of Woodstock township for many years. But one child, who expired in infancy, has been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth.



Martin Ruoff, for upwards of forty years an enterprising and influential farmer of the township of Woodstock, for thirty years the incumbent of the office of school director of the district in which he resides, and a gallant soldier throughout the great Civil war, is a native of Germany. He first beheld the light of day, Dec. 16, 1837, a son of John and Ursula (Leicht) Ruoff, also natives of Germany. The father was born in 1i92, and the mother in 1793, and all of their days were passed in their native land. The subject of this review immigrated to America .in 1854, landing at New York city, from whence he wended his way across country to Wyoming, where he remained until the outbreak of the Civil war. He then enlisted in Company K, Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, which regiment, known at first as Harlan's Light cavalry, was recruited in various states in August and September, 1861, as an independent organization and was mustered into the service of the Federal government at Philadelphia for three years. In October of that year it was assigned to Gen. I. N. Palmer's brigade, then encamped at Bell's Cross-roads, Va. On Nov. 13, it was designated as the One Hundred and Eighth Pennsylvania, as only state organizations were accepted, and from Nov. 17, 1861, to March, 1862. it was stationed at Fortress Monroe, Va. Among the more important actions in which this regiment participated early in the war were Deserted House, the attack on Franklin, and the defense of Suffolk and Hanover Court House, Va. Late in July, 1864, it became a part of Sheridan's force and joined in some of the more important of his famous operations, but remained with him only a few weeks at this time. In October, 1864, this organization of gallant soldiers participated in a number of engagements near Petersburg, Va., and in March of the ensuing year it again became a part of General Sheridan's command and shared in the success at Five Forks and the pursuit which followed, with frequent encounters, culminating in the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House. The regiment was mustered from the service at Richmond, Va., Aug. 13, 1865. Mr. Ruoff was actively engaged in the ranks during the entire period of his enlistment, with the exception of six days, which were passed in a Southern hospital, and he was honorably discharged from the service at Philadelphia, Aug. 13, 1865, upon the return of the regiment from Virginia. For the following six years he was engaged in farming near Scranton, Pa., and in 1871 he came to Michigan, settling in Woodstock township, where he purchased eighty acres of land, which, with forty acres subsequently acquired, constitutes the acreage of his present productive farm. He has continued to make the best of permanent improve-ments on his place and on every side are evidences of enterprise, thrift and prosperity. He is held in unqualified esteem in the community, and while he has never sought nor held public office, with the exception of that of school director, he takes a great interest in public affairs and is a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party. In his religious views he is very liberal, though he does not render allegiance to any church or denomination in particular. He is an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic and served as commander, of Post No. 416, at Brooklyn, Mich., for seven years. Mr. Ruoff was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe Bedell, Feb. 17, 1866, daughter of Zachariah and Margaret (Drake) Bedell, for many years residents of the state of Pennsyl-vania. To this happy marital union of Martin Ruoff and wife have been born thirteen children: John Ruoff, a successful farmer residing near Devil's Lake, this county, who is married to Clara Chessbro, and is the father of one child-Mattie; Ursula, the wife of Fred Dermeyer, a resident of Woodstock township, has one child, a boy, Otis; George wedded to Lulu Griffith, lives in Rollin township, this county, and is the father of one child, Martin; Martin L., the husband of Sarah Newton, is a resident of the township of Woodstock, and has two children-Carl and Hazel; Mary, the wife of I-Ienry Schweichtenberg, resides on a farm near Petersburg, Monroe county, Michigan, and is the mother of two children-Leland and Doris; David, married to Minnie Reeder, has one childMertie-and is a farmer of Woodstock township; William, the husband of Alice Houck, and a resident of Woodstock, is the father of one child-Glenn; four of the daughters-Maggie, Katharine, Caroline and Jennie-are unmarried and make their home with their parents; and two sons are deceased-Jacob, who died Nov. 2, 1872, and Andrew, who passed away Sept. 23. 18i7, both expiring in.early infancy. George Bowen, for many years a prominent and influential farmer in the township of Woodstock, Lenawee county, at one time deputy sheriff of Allegan county, and a gallant soldier in the Civil war, is a native of the Empire State. He was born in Norwich, Chenango county, New York, May 27, 1840, a son of Devello and Clarissa (Champion) Bowen, also natives of New York state. The father, born Dec. 22, 18io, was a shoemaker by trade, and in 1853, at the age of forty-three, migrated to Michigan, locating in Ottawa county, where he purchased forty acres of land. In 1857 he exchanged this for another forty in the immediate vicinity of the present city of Berlin, in the same county, where he continued to reside for many years. He passed away in 1gog, at the ripe age of ninety-nine, retaining his physical vigor and mental faculties to the very last. George Bowen, of this review, acquired his education in the schools of his native state and in those of Berlin, this state. At the youthful age of ten years he carried mail in New York state on horseback, and was thus engaged for three years, 1850-53 when he came to Michigan with his parents. In April, 1861, he responded to President Lincoln's call for 75,000 volunteers for three months' service by enlisting in the Second Michigan infantry. When his term of service expired he returned home, and on Sept. 7, of the same year, he enlisted as a member of Company F, Second Michigan cavalry. This regiment was organized at Grand Rapids, Mich, and was mustered into the service of the Federal government on Oct. 2, of that year. It left the state on Nov. 14, was stationed at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., was engaged in skirmishes at Point Pleasant, Tipton and New Madrid, Mo., participated in the siege of Island No. io, and then moved with Pope's army to Mississippi, where it became engaged at Pine Hill, Monterey and Farmington, and took an active part in the siege of -Corinth. Among other engagements, this regiment participated in a spirited fight at Booneville, July I, 1862, where 7,000 of Chalmer's cavalry were repulsed by six companies, numbering less than 500 men. This was one of the greatest minor victories of the war. The Second Michigan and Second Iowa cavalry followed the enemy for twenty miles, capturing a large amount of arms and clothing. The Second Michigan cavalry was actively engaged at Rienzi in August, when a largely superior force was defeated and dispersed and many prisoners were captured. It participated at Chickamauga, holding an important point against the enemy, and in October, 1863, was engaged in pursuit of Wheeler's cavalry, being in action at Anderson's Cross-roads. In December, of the same year it fought at Sparta, Dandridge and Mossy Creek, and at Dandridge and Pigeon River in January of the ensuing year. On the Atlanta campaign the regiment was engaged at Dug Gap, Red Clay, the Etowah River and Acworth, and joined General Thomas' army in Tennessee. In his four years of service Mr. Bowen participated in 117 engagements and skirmishes and was wounded three times. He received a musket ball in the left shoulder, but refused to'go to the hospital, and for three months was in the saddle with his arm in a sling, commanding his company after its captain had been seriously wounded. Though Mr. Bowen enlisted as a private, he was later advanced to the rank of corporal and then to that of sergeant. On March 23, 1864, he was commissioned second lieutenant, on Sept. i3, of that year he became a first lieutenant, and it was while serving in this rank that he was for a time in command of his company. The regiment was mustered from the service Aug. 17, 1865. Since the close of the war Mr. Bowen has been actively engaged in farming. In politics he is a Republican, and though he has not fostered aspirations for public office, he was for a number of years chosen constable by the electors of Woodstock township, and for two years he was deputy sheriff of Allegan county. Concerning religious questions he en-tertains very liberal views and is not affiliated with any particular congregation or denomination. In 1865, he was united in matrimony to Miss,Imogene Lewis, daughter of G. M. and Elizabeth (Tower) Lewis, who for many years before their demise were residents of the village of Addison. The happy marital union of Mr. and Mrs. Bowen has been blessed with the birth of four children Elizabeth, born July 22, 1866; George Lewis, born July 6, 1873; Oral A., born Nov. 20, 11875; and John Frederick, born Sept. 14, 1886. Elizabeth is the wife of Ellsworth Sherman, a resident of Omaha, Neb., and is the mother of two children: Hazel, born Sept. r6, 1886, and George, Jr., born Nov. 9, 189o. George Lewis, a resident of Benton Harbor, Mich., is the husband of Ida Nagel, and is prominent in the circles of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has one son-Grant Fellows-born March 4, 1899. Oral A. is married to Leona Flint, and is the father of two childrenPaul Flint, born May 9, 1904, and Ellsworth, born Oct. 5, 1905. John Frederick, the youngest of the children of George Bowen and wife, married Miss Judith Spaulding, assistant principal of the Addison High School, and daughter of George G. and Ella E. (Nelson) Spaulding, of Belleview, Mich. Mr. Spaulding is a prominent merchant. John F. Bower resides with his parents, and is prominent in Masonic circles.



Leroy Turrell is another of the native sons of Lenawee county who has attained to success as a follower of agricultural pursuits, being one of the prosperous and 'representative farmers of Wood-stock township. He was born on the old Turrell homestead there, Nov. 7, 1852, and is a son of Warren and Katherine (Daley) Turrell, the former of whom was born Feb. 7, 1815, in the state of Massachusetts, and the latter was a native 'of the Emerald Isle, born May 17, 1817, and died Oct. 30, 1887. The Turrells came from Pennsylvania to Michigan at a very early day and became numbered among the pioneer settlers of this county. The grandfather, David Turrell, secured boo acres of government land in the township of Woodstock, a large portion of which he reclaimed from the virgin forest, and here he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in i85o. He identified himself with the Democratic party very early in life and continued to espouse its cause to the very last, though he himself never aspired to public office. He was ever a broad-minded and progressive citizen, and took a profound interest in matters pertaining to the public welfare. Warren Turrell, the father of our subject, was reared on his father's (David) farm, and was educated in the common schools. He received eighty acres of land from his father, and by purchase finally possessed 18o acres, at the time of his death, March 20, 1895. In politics he was a Democrat. Leroy Turrell was reared on the old farmstead of his parents, and early became inured to the strenuous labor involved in its improvement and cultivation, in the meanwhile duly availing himself of the educational advantages of the district schools of the community. He has continued to make farming his chief occupation, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits and being recognized as a trustworthy and enterprising business man, entirely worthy of the confidence and esteem so freely accorded him. He is public-spirited and, like his estimable father before him, is a stanch supporter of the cause and principles of the Democratic party, though he has not been a seeker of public office. Mr. Turrell is not affiliated with any religious organization, but is broad-minded and liberal in his views on religion. On Dec. 2, 1877, 'he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Ada Swartout, daughter of Isaac and Mary Ann (Lockwood) Swartout, who were residents of Woodstock for many years prior to their deaths, the former being a farmer. The happy union of. Leroy Turrell and wife has been blessed with the birth of seven children: Claude, the eldest, born Nov. 30, 1878, is unmarried and teaches school in the township of Woodstock ; Frank, born Dec. 25, 188o, is the husband of Julia Handlon, and the father of one child, Frank, Jr.; Seeley, born Jan. 4, 1886, is unmarried and makes his home with his parents; Bell, born March 17, 1888, is wedded to Merrill Taylor, and resides in Woodstock township; Bernice, born July 2, 1894, resides at the parental home, as do also Nettie, born April 26, 1897, and Rosalie, born Dec. 10, 1899.



Wessel David Harris, for many years a well known and influential farmer of Woodstock, first beheld the light of day on the old Harris homestead in that township, April 16, 1846, a son of G. F. and Phoebe (Brooks) Harris, natives of the Empire State. The father came to Lenawee county in his young manhood and purchased 200 acres of land from the Federal government, in the township of Woodstock, where he continued to reside up to the day of his death, in 1898, being eighty-two years old. He was ever a loyal Democrat in politics, but never fostered any ambition for public office. Wessel David Harris acquired his education in the district schools of Woodstock township, dividing the days of his early youth between the school room and his father's farm, and at an early age he learned the lesson of hard work and self-dependence. Later he purchased a farm in the community in which he was reared, and from that day to this he has successfully followed agricultural pursuits. Though his respected and honored sire was a Democrat, politically, Mr. Harris, of this sketch, has allied himself with the opposite political party-the Republican-though he has not been an office-seeker. • On Dec. 31, 1864, he was united in matrimony to Miss Nellie Turner, daughter of J. W. and Mary (Walker) Turner, for many years residents of Woodstock township. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Harris-Cora, Mae, Edwinne, William Henry, Nellie, Phoebe, Edward, and a child who died in infancy. Cora, born July 31, 1866, married Louis Pearson, but departed this life, Feb. 24, 1886, before she had attained her twentieth year. Mae, born Jan. 8, 1870, passed away, Feb. 2, 1873, aged three years. Edwinne is wedded to Del Pearson, and is the father of four children; Hazel, born July 12, 1881 ; Glenn, born May 29, 1993; Gale, born Feb. 14, 1904; and Forrest, born April 6, 1909. William Henry, born Sept. 12, 1874, is the husband of Pansy Linsner, and the father of two children: Florence, born Jan. 13, 1903, and Wilmeth, born Nov. 16, 19o5. Nellie is the wife of D. Boley, of Wheat land township, Hillsdale county, and has two children-Orville and Illa. Phoebe married John Van Etten, now deceased, and is the mother of one child-Ray-born Aug. 30, 1905, the mother and son now making their home with the subject of this review. Edward C., the youngest of the surviving children, was born March 24, 18g1, and is living with his father. Nellie (Turner) IIarris, the beloved wife of Wessel David Harris, was born Sept. 14, 1846, on the farm upon which her devoted husband now resides. On Nov. 7, 1903, after a long and protracted illness, she cast aside life's earthly mantle and passed to the Great Unknown. She was ever a kind, devoted and dutiful wife and mother, and today there is a place in the hearts of many in the community_ in. which she passed all her well spent days, which will never be filled by another. Many a wife and mother will perform her work more faithfully and con-scientiously because of the influence of her life. One of the kindliest disposed of women, she did not permit her feelings to control her judgment, and though she was ever tolerant of the opinions of others, willing to yield in minor matters, she did not compromise with what she believed to be wrong. In all truth it may be said that those who knew her best loved her most.



William Henry Harris, now a resident of Lansing, Mich., but for many years a prominent and influential agriculturist of Woodstock, of which township he is a native, first beheld the light of day at the home of his parents on the old Detroit-Chicago turnpike, Nov. 6, 1851, son of Garrett' and Phoebe (Brooks) Harris. He received his schooling in the district schools of Woodstock township, and assisted his. parents about the farm, mornings and evenings, and worked _upon the place throughout the long summetvacations. Hence he became familiar with the farming industry very early in life, an occupation which he pursued with success up to about a year ago, when he removed with his family to Lansing. In politics he is actively affiliated with the Democratic party, though he has never sought public office. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the order of the Knights of the Maccabees, belonging to the local lodges of these organizations at Cement City, and he is also affiliated with the local Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry. For twenty-seven years he has been a member of the Baptist church, in which he has rendered effective service in the cause of the -Kingdom of Righteousness. In 1875 he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Lydia Swartout, daughter of James Swartout (of whom a sketch appears elsewhere in this voltime) and Katherine (Kelley) Swartout, residents of Woodstock for many years. This happy marital union has been blessed by the birth of three . children: Blanche. George Freer and Lowell J_ Blanche, born Feb. 27, 1878, is happily married to George Bohnet, of Lansing, Mich. George F., born Aug. 3r, 1879, is now the husband of Elma Rtinyon, though he was previously wedded to Ethel Alderdice, now deceased, and is the father of two daughters-Lelia and Ruth-who reside on their parents' farm in the township of Woodstock. Lowell J., born Feb. 8, 1883, resides in Lansing, and is unmarried.



Egbert Every, for many years a leading farmer of Woodstock, is a native of Jackson county, this state, having first beheld the light of day, Sept. 21, 1852. His father, John Every, was born in the Catskill Mountains, New York, Oct. 18, 1826, and was one of a family of ten children, among whom were Matilda, Margaret, Helen and Nancy, deceased; Jacob, Daniel and Robert, residents of the township of Columbia, Jackson county, Mich.; -and two others, who passed away many years ago. John Every came with his parents to Jackson county, Mich., from his home in the Empire State, in r831, when but five years of age. His father, the grandsire of Egbert, of this sketch, at once took up 32o acres of land in that county, a portion of which he immediately proceeded to clear and transform into a tillable condition. John Every was a hardworking, thrifty and enterprising farmer during most of his days, and he was a resident of Jackson and Lenawee counties for upwards of seventy-five years. In politics he was ever a loyal adherent of the Democratic party, though he was never a seeker of public office. He passed away June 25, Lgo6, at the ripe old age of eighty. His wife, the mother of Egbert Every-Emma Jane (McCurdy)-was also a native of the Empire State, born Feb. 21, 1831, reared and educated in New York, and migrated to Michigan with her parents in her early womanhood, where she became acquainted with and married John Every. She passed to the Great Beyond, Jan. 8, 1889, aged fifty-eight, leaving to mourn her untimely taking away her beloved husband and two children-Egbert, of this sketch, and Lena, a resident of Rollin township, the wife of Marcus Ballard, and the mother of two children-Raymond and Leo Ballard. Egbert Every was reared in his native county and received his educational training in the district schools there. Upon leaving school he took to farming and for several years conducted a place of his own in Lenawee county.' Later he exchanged this farm for one of 197 acres in Woodstock township, upon which he continues to reside. In politics he has always been active in Democratic circles, though, like his father before .him, he has never fostered aspirations for public office. Concerning religion he has ever entertained liberal views and is not affiliated with any congregation, though he is a frequent attendant upon the services of the churches in his community. Though nearing the sixtieth milestone of life's journey, Mr. Every is still vigorous and active, and judging by the ripe age attained by his honored and respected sire it would seem that he still has many years of usefulness before him. Horace Wilcox, a prominent and influential citizen of Cement City, this county, was born in the township of Ogden, Lenawee county, Oct. 26, 1842. His father, Aaron Wilcox, a native of the Empire State, married Azubah Mark, mother of the subject of this review, and a native of the state of Connecticut. Together they migrated to Lenawee county and located on eighty acres of government land in the township of Ogden, where they continued to make their home for sixteen years. They then traded their farm in Ogden for Loo acres in Palmyra township, where the father re= sided up to the time of his death, in 1864. Horace, of this review, acquired his elementary education in the district schools of his native township and in those of Palmyra township. His supplementary scholastic training was attained at the Raisin Institute, and under the supervision of Prof. Hubbard at Adrian. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, Fourth Michigan cavalry, which regiment was commanded by Col. R. I-I. G. Minty. His company was at first captained by Richard B. Robbins, of Adrian, who later came to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. Though Mr. Wilcox enlisted as a private, in which capacity he served for two years, he was later promoted to the rank of corporal, which continued to be his official title until the cessation of hostilities. He saw much active service and participated in many of the bloodiest encounters of the war. The regiment was mustered into service at Detroit, Aug. 29, 1862, and left the state, Sepf. 26, of the same year, going first to Louisville, thence to Tennessee, and it was engaged at Stanford, Gallatin, Lebanon, Rural Hill, Baird's Mill, Hollow Tree Gap, Wilson's Creek Road, Franklin, Laurel Hill, Stone's River, and other places before the close of the year. Before the close of the war Mr. Wilcox participated in numerous other battles, among the more important of which were Tullahoma, Tenn., Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge and Chickamauga. In 1864 he was in a number of actions incident to the memorable campaign of Atlanta, including the charge at Kennesaw Mountain, and he was present at the surrender of the-city of Atlanta. He was mustered out of the service at Nashville, Tenn. Since the war Mr. Wilcox has been successfully engaged in farming and at various times has taught school in the districts immediately surrounding his farm. He is a Republican politically, and though he has never sought public office he was for two years selected by popular vote to the office of tpwnship superintendent of schools, when that office was in existence. He is a devout and enthusiastic member of the Congregational church, with which religious faith he has been affiliated for thirtysix years. On Dec. 24, 1865, he was united in holy Wedlock to Miss Amanda McCourtie, daughter of Thomas and Catherine McCourtie, who for many years before their deaths resided in the township of Woodstock. Of this happy union three children were born ; Jennie M., wife of Wilson Welch, of Forest Hill, Mich., and the mother of two children; Edith Lou, wife of Benjamin North, of Cement City; and Harry D., who has been married twice-the first time .to Miss Florence George, to which union one child was born, and the second time to Miss Lulu Kamerer, of Baltimore, Md. The present wife of Horace Wilcox is Martha Wilcox (nee Lord). Frank A. Wilson, a prosperous and highly respected agriculturist of Woodstock, is a native of that township, born Sept. 6, 18S9, on the farm upon which he today resides, a son of Phileman and Esther Wilson. His father was born in the Empire State, in 1820, and many years ago migrated to the township of Woodstock and took up loo acres of government land, upon which he continued to reside until his death, in 1873. He was a life-long Democrat and never aspired to public office. The mother of Frank A. Wilson, Esther (Davis) Wilson, was a native of the Wolverine State, born in 1829, and passed away Feb. 18, igoi. The subject of this review was one of a family of seven children: Viola, deceased ; Francis, deceased; Louisa I.; Charles, deceased ; Ella, Dora and Frank A., of this sketch. -Viola was the wife of J. D. Lawrence, of Jackson, Mich., and the mother of four children: Charles, married to Ida Bodges; Wilson and Ida, deceased; and a child who expired in infancy. Louisa married George Wheeler, a resident of Wheatland township, and has one adopted child-Leo. Charles and Francis both died in infancy. Ella, who is Mrs. Frank Whitney, of Brooklyn, Mich., is the mother of one child-Wilson. Dora is the wife of Henry Wheeler, of the township of Columbia, Jackson county, and was the mother of three children, though but one child survives-Marie. Frank A. Wilson, to whom this record is dedicated, received his educational training in district school No. I, in his native township, and has always resided on the farm which he today owns and operates, and which was inherited from his respected father. In politics he is allied with'the Democratic party, and, like his parent, he has never been a seeker of public office. In his religious views he is very liberal, and though a Christian, has never been affiliated with any religious denomination. On Nov. 12, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Sylvia Every, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Harris) Every, to which union was born one child-Earl-born' Aug. io, 188o, now the husband of Murtella North, daughter of Lucian and Murtella (Harper) North, of Somerset township, Hillsdale county. Earl and his wife are the parents of one child-Esther-born July 15, -1902. Mrs. Frank A. Wilson is a native of Columbia township, Jackson county, Michigan, born June 18, 1858, and is one of six children, the others being Harris, Alma, Otis, Edward and Melvin. - Harris Every, a resident of Columbia township, Jackson county, is married to Lelia Smith, and is the father of one child-Rollo. Alma, also a resident of Colum-bia township, is the wife of Louis Woodward, and is the mother of two children-Jerry, of Columbia township, and Lozelle married to Alberta Blood. Mr. and Mrs. Blood reside at Dunkirk, N. Y., and are the parents of two children-Lois and Clarence. Otis Every is the husband of Mary Parker, and the father of four children-Leola, Hattie, Earl, Edson and Edra-and is a resident of Columbia township. Edward is married to Mary Gregory and has one child-Phyllis. Melvin Every is the husband of Leota Wisner and the father of three children-Reid, Louise and Mildred-and resides in the village of Brooklyn, Jackson county, Michigan.



James H. Rogers, one of Lenawee county's venerable and most highly esteemed agriculturists, now in his eighty-fourth" year, has been a resident of Woodstock township for sixty-four years. He, like many of the other early settlers in this section of the commonwealth, is a native of the Empire State, and was born Dec. 20, 1825. His parents were James L. and Charilla (Curtis) Rogers, the for-' mer of whom was born July 29, 1789, and the latter June 29, 1797, both also natives of the state of New York. In 1845, in company with his respected parents, James H. Rogers migrated westward to Michigan and located in the township of Woodstock, where the father purchased eighty acres of land from a Mr. Ricker. Here James H. resided for seven years and then purchased the farm of 261 _acres, which he today owns and operates. The father, for many years a farmer in Woodstock township, was ever a loyal and enthusiastic member of the Democratic party, and during his long residence there was on various occasions selected by the electors of the township to discharge the duties of the different public offices thereof. He passed to the life eternal Feb. 7, 1883, at the ripe old age of ninety-one years, six months and nine days, and his beloved wife died March 19, 1887, aged eighty-nine years, eight months and twenty days. There were eight children in the family John C., who now resides in the village of Addison ; Frederick, now a resident of Somerset township, Hillsdale county; Marion, who makes her home at Clark's Lake, Jackson county; James H., the subject of this sketch; and four daughters who are deceased-Sarah, Alma, Emily and Elizabeth. The subject of this record was reared to the sturdy discipline of rural life and at a tender age acquired the lessons of hard work and self-reliance. At the same time he gained an intimate knowledge of farming, which has been his chief occupation from his early youth to the present time. His educational advantages were those afforded by the common schools of his native state and he has ever been recognized as a man of strong mentality, sound judgment, executive ability and marked individuality. He today owns and resides upon a fertile and productive farm of nearly 300 acres, having secured the same when it was covered with the native timber, and he has personally effected the reclamation of nearly every acre. The first buildings which he erected on the place were of the primitive type, but these were later replaced with the present modern ones which now adorn and add to the value and attractiveness of this well cultivated farm. Mr. Rogers is a loyal and public-spirited citizen, is a Democrat in politics, and at different times has been elected to each public office in the township in which he resides, with the exception of the office of supervisor. On April 2, 1864, he was united in marriage to Miss Marietta N. Wilson, also a native of New York, born Jan. M, 1832, daughter of John and Harriet (Lang) Wilson, residents of Woodstock township for many years prior to their deaths. This long and happy marital union has been blessed with the birth of three children-two sons and one daughter-namely: John IV., born Oct. 12, 1868, who is managing his father's old homestead, and who is wedded to Minnie M. Lane, and the father of one child-Glenn Lane, who was born Jan. 17, 1892; Eugene, born Sept. 30, 1871, is the husband of Mary Kline, and a resident of the village of Addison, where he is a partner in the firm of Kline, Dean & Rogers; and Katy, who died Nov. 9, 1883, at the age of seventeen years. Though rapidly approaching the eighty-fifth milestone of life's journey, Mr. Rogers still retains his physical vigor and is in full possession of his mental faculties, and judging by the ripe age attained by his respected parents, prior to taking their departure to the life eternal, it would seem, and is to be sincerely hoped, that he will be spared to his family and the community for many years to come.



James C. Morley, for many years a blacksmith and for the last decade a prosperous agriculturist in Woodstock, was born in that township on the farm which he today operates. He was born on George Washington's birthday, Feb. 22, in 1843, son of Hiara and Betsey (Webster) Morley, natives of the Empire State. He acquired his educational training in the district schools of Woodstock township, and worked upon his parents' and neighboring farms until he was sixteen years of age. In October, 1859, he commenced to work at the blacksmith trade, which he followed for about forty years, with the exception of two and one-half years, which he spent in the Civil war. On Dec. 28, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company I,. Seventh Michigan cavalry. This regiment was organized at Grand Rapids, Mich., during the summer, fall and early winter of 1862, being one of the cavalry regiments which Secretary ,of War Stanton authorized the Hon. W. F. Kellogg to recruit at that time. On Jan. 27, 1863, the last contingent of the ten companies was mustered in, and on Feb. 27, of that year, the entire regiment had reached Washington, D. C. It encamped on what was then known as Meridian Hill and remained there for about a month. On March 26, at Fairfax Court House, Va., it was united with the Fifth and Sixth Michigan cavalry into a brigade, which was assigned to General Stahel's cavalry division, Department of Washington. Among the engagements in which this gallant regiment participated were Catlett's Station, Snicker's Gap, Kelley's Ford, Culpeper Court House, Raccoon Ford, White's Ford, Meadow Bridge, of the Chickahominy; Darney's Ferry, Crump's Creek, Old Church, Va. ; Hanover, Hunterstown, Monterey, Williamsport, Smithburg, I-lagerstown, Falling Waters, Pa., etc. The total enrollment of the regiment was 1,779, and its loss during service was 332. The subject of this review was wounded in the action at Shep-ardstown, Va., and received his discharge from the service June 15, 1865. He then returned to Woodstock township and followed the blacksmith trade, which he continued up to about 1897, and since then he has been successfully engaged in farming on the, old Morley homestead, on which he was born. In politics he is active in Democratic circles and for several years was the incumbent of the office of deputy sheriff of Lenawee county. Concerning religious matters he entertains very liberal views and is not affiliated with any particular denomination.. On Dec. 24, 1905, he was united in marriage to Susan Bedell, daughter of Zachariah and Margaret (Drake) Bedell, and though no children have been horn to this union Mr. Morley has a son, Don C., by a former marriage, a resident of Detroit, Mich., and a candy-maker by trade.



Thomas Marr is one of those energetic and progressive individuals who have attained to success in agricultural pursuits, and he is numbered among the prosperous and popular farmers, of Cambridge township. He is a native of Liverpool, England, born April 29, 1859, and is, a son of Thomas Marr, Sr., and Elizabeth (Spencer) Marr. His venerable father, a native of the Emerald Isle, first beheld the light of day in County Tipperary, province of Munster, Ireland, where he was also reared and received his schooling. At an early age he immigrated to Liverpool, England, and launched forth in the drayage and cartage business, which he continued to make his chief occupation until his death, in 1873. The mother was born and educated in Liverpool, England, where her marriage to Mr. Marr was solemnized, and she passed to the Great Unknown in 1875, admired and respected by all who knew herThomas Marr., Jr., to whom this sketch is dedicated, acquired his ,educational training in the public graded schools and the high school at Liverpool. He was one of three children, of whom the others were James, deceased., and Elizabeth, a resident of England. In the days of his early manhood he immigrated to America, landing at New York city and coming to - Lenawee county, where he has since been engaged in farming. By hard work and good management he has become independent and has made the best of improvements on his place. On every side are evidences of thrift and prosperity. He is held in high esteem in the community, and while he has never fostered any personal ambition for public office, he takes a great interest in public affairs and is a stanch supporter of the "Grand Old Party." Religiously he entertains a preference for the church of the Roman Catholic faith and is a member of the fraternal order of the Knights of the Maccabees, lodge No. 503, of Onsted. On Feb. 1, 1888, Mr. Marr was united in holy matrimony to.Miss Jennie E. Parkhurst, daughter of James A. and Eliza (Wilsey) Parkhurst, the former of whom was born in Genesee county, New York, and the latter in Ohio. They came to Michigan in an early day. The father passed away Oct. 5, 1876, and his beloved wife is now residing in the country at the head of Devil's Lake, the mother of three children : Henry R. Parkhurst, who resides at Devil's Lake, and is the husband of Myrtie Coburn; Betsey Halsey, who makes her residence in the village of Addison; and Eliza, who is the wife of the subject of this review. Of the union of Thomas Marr and wife have been born ten children: Paul, born March 9, I89o, died Sept. 26, 18g1, and the others arc William H., born July 25, 1881 ; Frank G., born April 20, T893; Thomas 0., born March 13, 1894; Eliza E., born July 13, 1895; Roy M., born Feb_ 26, 1897; Leo E., born June 20, 1898; Bessie Marie, born Nov. 7, Igoo;_ Bernice, born March 29, 19o2; Alice G., born Jan. 24, 1904, all of whom reside at the parental home. Frank C. Steves, an industrious and successful farmer of Woodstock, is a native of the Empire State, having been horn in Wayne county, New York, Aug. 15, 1839. His father, E. S. M. Steves, a native of Dutchess county, New York, migrated to Michigan in an early day, settling in Ingham county, where he took up 40o acres of government land. There he lived for twenty-five years and then sold his property and purchased eighty-eight acres east of the village of Brooklyn, Jackson county, where he continued to reside for eight years.. he then purchased thirteen acres in Cambridge township, and lived there about six years. He then sold this place and removed to Woodstock township, where he bought 12o acres of land, which is now the property of Frank C. Sieves, of this record. He died in 1882, and his wife, Hannah (Smith) Steves, the mother of the subject of this sketch, who was also a native of Duichess county, New York, passed to the Great Beyond in 1892. Frank C. Steves acquired his educational training in the district schools of his native state and in Ingham county, Michigan, dividing his early days between the school room and his father's farm, thus learning at a tender age the lessons of arduous labor and self-reliance, at the same time acquiring a practical knowledge of farming. He has continued to follow agricultural pursuits and has always met with success in this, his life's vocation. In politics he is an active and enthusiastic Republican, though he has not participated in the political game for the purpose of personal profit or advancement. In matters pertaining to religion he has a preference for the Episcopal faith, though he is not directly affiliated with any church society of that or any other denomination. On Dec.- 2o, 1867, he was united in marriage with Mary Brimley, daughter of John and Ann Wesprey Brimley. Mrs. Steves' parents were English, the father having been born in Northamptonshire, and the mother in Leicestershire., They were married in England, and immigrated to Clinton, . Y., where they resided until they came to Michigan, about 1837, and they resided .at Clinton, Mich., for about five years. They then removed to a farm in Columbia township, Washtenaw county, where they lived the residue of their lives. To the union of Frank C. Steves and wife have been born three children: George, Ella Louise, and Frederick. George, born March 14, 1869, is a graduate of the State Normal School at Ypsilanti, Mich., the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and at the present time he is seeking a higher degree at Clark University at Wooster, Mass. His ambition is to be a professor of psychology. Ella Louise, born Sept. 18, 1871, resides at the home of her parents. Frederick, born May 8, 1873, is a resident of Cambridge township, and married to Florence Boomer, and is the father of two children-Myrtle Ella and Karl Stanley, who reside with their parents.



William Green, for many. years a well known and highly, esteemed farmer of the township of Woodstock, is a native of the Buckeye State, having been born at East Cleveland, Ohio, Feb. Io, 1862. His father, Philip Green, first beheld the light of day in Surrey, England, Oct. 2, 1829, and the mother, Marion Harriet (Sandlin) Green, was a native of the same place, born in I83 1. They immigrated to America about 1859, landing at New York city and coming directly to East Cleveland, Ohio, where the father purchased from one Isaac Page, ten acres of land, which he continued to reside on and cultivate for several years thereafter. Later he sold the place and removed to Lenawee county, purchasing 132 acres of land in Woodstock township, and there he continued to make his residence up to the time of his demise, April 25, 1904. His wife, the mother of William Green, of this review, preceded him in death by a little over two years, having been summoned home Jan. 6, 19o2, leaving her husband and eight children to mourn her loss. The children are Katherine, Caroline, Sarah and Jennie, who are unmarried' and reside on the old homestead ; Harry, a resident of Jackson county, the husband of Emogine Holmes, and the father of one child-Florence; Arthur, married to Gertrude Baskerville, and a resident of the city of Hudson; Ida, the wife of Marian L. Morgan and the mother of three children-Tressy, Gail and Litha; and William, of this record. Gail, the daughter of Ida (Green) Morgan, is married to Clarence Alderdyce, and is the mother of two children-Francis and Marian. The subject of this sketch received his educational training in the district schools of Woodstock, having removed to that township with his parents in his early-youth. While not engaged with his studies he assisted his parents about the farm and thus became familiar with the "ins and outs" of farming at an early.age, and he has continued to make this his chief occupation. Politically Mr. Green is affiliated with the Democratic party, though he has never sought public office. Having been born of parents who were both natives of the British Isle it is only natural that 'in religious matters he should entertain Episcopal views, though he himself is not affiliated with any denomination.



Richard Clarkson, one of the sterling citizens whose memory linked the early pioneer era in Lenawee county with the latter days of opulent prosperity and advanced civilization, was one of the representative farmers of Macon township and was a citizen who ever commanded the high regard of all who knew him. He came, to this county with his parents when a lad of eight years. and his reminiscences of the early days were ever interesting and graphic, for the family settled in the county several years prior to the admission of the Territory of Michigan as one of the sovereign states of our great Republic. Mr. Clarkson continued to reside on his fine homestead farm, in Macon township, until his death, which - occurred April 3, 1898. His memory is revered by all who came within the sphere of his kindly and generous influence. Like many others of the honored pioneers of this county. Mr. Clarkson was a native of beautiful old Seneca county, New York, where he was horn May 28, 1823. , He was a son of Daniel and Deborah (Cadmus) Clarkson, the former of whom was born in New Jersey, and the latter in the state of New York. In 1831 the parents emigrated to the wilds of the Territory of Michigan, and they numbered themselves among the early settlers of Lenawee county. The father secured a tract of government land in Macon township, and he reclaimed a considerable portion of this from the virgin forest before he was summoned from the scene of life's mortal endeavors. Both he and his wife remained on the homestead mentioned until they were summoned to that "undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns." Further mention of the family genealogy niay be found in the sketch of the career of James Clarkson, on other pages of this volume. As already stated, the subject of this memoir was eight years of age at the time when his parents removed from the old Empire State to Lenawee county. He was reared to manhood under the scenes and influences of the pioneer era, and his early educational privileges were limited to the primitive district and subscription schools, which were maintained by the pioneers with no slight difficulty and sacrificing. He never wavered in his allegiance to the great basic art of agriculture, and through his energy and ability it was his to attain to more than ordinary success as a farmer and stock-grower. He inherited sixty-five acres of his father's old homestead, and in addition to this owned the fine farm of loo acres where his widow still maintains her home. He made the best of improvements on his farms and his homestead stands today as one of the model places of Macon-township-a perpetual monument to his well directed efforts and good judgment as a business man. He ordered his life upon a high plane of integrity and honor, was tolerant and kindly in his association with his fellow men, and his genial personality gained and retained to him inviolable friendships, of which he was ever deeply apprecia-tive. He never manifested aught of desire to enter the arena of practical politics, though he was a stanch supporter of the cause of the Prohibition party, and took a loyal and intelligent interest in the questions and issues of the hour. He contributed to the material and civic upbuilding of the county, and his name merits an enduring place on the roll of the honored pioneers of this favored section of the Wolverine Commonwealth. He was a zealous member of the Reformed church, with which his widow also has been identified as an active member for many years. On Nov. 10, 1852, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Clarkson to Miss Mary M. Osgood, who was born in Seneca county, New York, Jan. 1, 1833, and who is a daughter of John and Martha (Van Vleet) Osgood, both likewise natives of the state of New York, where the former-was born in 18oo and the latter in 1807. Mr. Osgood died in Seneca county, New York, in 1841, and in 1845 his widow came with her six children to Lenawee county, and purchased a farm of eighty acres, in Macon township. The devoted mother passed the closing days of her life in the home of her son, William, in Macon township, where she died Feb. 24, 1905, at the venerable age of ninetyeight years. She was undoubtedly the oldest resident of the county at the time of her demise, and she is held in reverent memory by all who knew her. In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the three children of Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson : Josephine, who completed a course in the Tecumseh High School, remains with her mother on the old homestead, as does also Martha E., who likewise completed the curriculum of the Tecumseh High School. Ella, who was educated in the public schools of Macon township, is the wife of John Mark Pennington, of Macon township, and they have one son, Richard Clarkson Pennington, who is now a student in the Tecumseh High School.



Steven D. Drake, for many years one of the leading farmers of Woodstock, first beheld the light of day on the old Drake homestead in that township, Dec. 12, 1862. His father, George Drake, a native of the Keystone State, born Jan. 27, 1835, migrated westward to Lenawee county in 1845 in company with his parents, who settled on a. farm of forty acres in the township of Woodstock. Later he increased the acreage of the place to 12o acres, which he continued to operate up,to the time of his death, March 28, 1899. Steven D. Drake, of this sketch, received his education in the district ,schools of Woodstock, and when not occupied with his studies `he was busily engaged in assisting his parents about the farm. Consequently at an early age he learned the arduous lesson of hard work and acquired an intimate knowledge of farming, which occupation he has continued to pursue with success and profit to this day. Politically he is actively affiliated with the Democratic party and on various occasions has been selected by the electors of Woodstock to discharge the duties of several township officesamong them those of treasurer, justice of the peace and highway commissioner, and for eighteen years he has been school director in the school district in which he resides, which evinces the high repute in which his judgment and executive ability are held by his fellow townsmen. During the last seven years he has been a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, though formerly for a period of six years, he was affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church, and in both organizations he has rendered effective service in behalf of the Kingdom of Righteousness. On Nov. 28, 1883,. Mr. Drake was united in holy wedlock to Eva Van Camp, daughter of Richard and Mary E. (Smith) Van Camp, of whom the former is deceased, and the latter is now residing in Somerset Center, Hillsdale county. Four children have blessed the happy marital union of Mr. and Mrs. Drake : Zadia, born in 1884, is the wife of Benjamin Allen, of Woodstock township, and the mother of two children-Harry and Mabel ; Lester, born Dec. 31, 1885, a resident of Woodstock township, is the husband of Laura Bliesath, and the father of two children-Myrtle and Otto; Emmett, born Nov. 3, 1893, is unmarried and resides with his parents; and Oral, born July 30, 1goo, also lives at home.



Lorenzo Daniels, a thrifty farmer and a pioneer of Lenawee county, whose postoffice address is Pentecost, was born in Franklin township, Jan. 16, 1842. He is the son of Harrison and Sylvia (Hadley) Daniels, the former born in Vermont, April 4, 181o, and the latter in Cattaraugus county, New York, May 26, 18og. The father removed with his parents to New York when he was a small boy, and in 1835 he came to Michigan and entered a tract of land under the homestead law. Two years later he sold his claim and removed to De Kalb county, Indiana, but subsequently he sold his eighty acres of land in the Hoosier State and returned to Franklin township. Before the birth of the Republican party he was an ardent Whig and an Abolitionist, but in later life became allied with the first-named political organization. Before the war his home was known as one of the stations on the famous "underground railway," by which negro fugitives made their way to Canada. Both he and his wife, to whom he was united Oct. 18, 1835, were devout communicants of the Methodist Episcopal church. To them were born five children, three of whom survive. Julia, the eldest, now deceased, became the wife of Robert Glen, who kept the first store established at Onsted, but later moved to Chicago and still later to Mississippi, where both he and his wife died, leaving four children-Frank, Fred, Robert (deceased), and Phoebe. Edwin died in infancy. Mary became, the wife of Nicholas Simmons, now deceased, a farmer in Franklin township,_ who served through the Civil war as first sergeant of a company in the Eleventh Michigan cavalry, and at his death left, beside his widow, one child, Lydia. Fletcher, the youngest, is a Franklin township farmer, and by his marriage to Miss Minnie Tuttle, is the father of four sons-Arnold, Harry, Ray and Glenn. Lorenzo Daniels, the third child of his parents in order of birth, received the limited scholastic advantages afforded by the district schools of his -boy hood days. On leaving school he found employment with his father until November, 1863, and then, seized with a martial enthusiasm, he enlisted as a. private in Company D of the Eleventh Michigan cavalry. He participated with signal valor in all of the engagements in which the regiment was involved, from the-time of his enlistment until he was mustered out with the other members. After the cessation of hostilities he purchased a farm in Livingston county, with 'his brother-in-law, Robert Glen, and he remained there for a period of five years. Upon his return to Franklin township, at the' end of that time, he purchased his present farm of 114 acres, and he has since been successfully, conducting a general farming business, devoting himself to no one particular branch of the science. In his political relations Mr. Daniels is unswerving in his allegiance to the Republican party, but has never been an aspirant for public office. His religious nature finds expression in attendance upon the services of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1866 he became a Mason, at Fowlerville, Mich., and now is identified with Finch Lodge, No. 720, at Onsted. He is also a member of Biers Post, No. 140, Grand Army of the Republic, at Tecumseh. On Oct. 26, 1866, was solemnized Mr. Daniels' marriage to Miss Eliza A. Graham, whose parents-Arthur and Jane (Crozter) Graham-came from Ireland to New York in i86o, and later removed to Michigan. Five children have been the issue of this union. Sylvia, born March 22, 1869, is the wife of Grant Ogden, a merchant at Tipton, and she is the mother of one child. Arthur G., born Sept. 28, 1874, is employed in the postoffice in Chicago. His wife died some years ago, leaving him two young daughters-Dorothy and Lorraine. Jennie, born May 25, 1876, died in infancy. Julia E., horn May 25, 1878, is the wife of Newell Wisner, a farmer in Franklin township. Harry G., the youngest, born March 28, 1882, was married Oct. 28, 1908, to Miss Maud Murray. He is a telegraph operator for the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railway at Angola, Ind.

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History of Lenawee County
published by The Western Historical Society in 1909. Book 1
Book 2

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