History of Lenawee County, Michigan - Book 2, Page 91



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MEMOIRS OF LENAWEE COUNTY BIOGRAPHICAL - CONTINUED
Moses Schoonover is one of the progressive farmers of the younger generation in Seneca township, where he is the owner of a well improved and productive farm of one hundred and sixty acres. His energy and good management are clearly indicated in the general thrift and prosperity which are distinctively in evidence in all parts of his landed estate, and he is known as a reliable, public-spirited and loyal citizen of his adopted county. Like many others of the valued citizens of Lenawee county, Mr. Schoonover claims.the old Buckeye State as the place of his nativity. He was born in Putnam county, Ohio, April 12, 1875, and is a son of Moses and Ellen (Boggs) Schoonover, the former of whom was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, a representative of one of the pioneer families of that state, and the latter was likewise native-born of Ohio. Moses Schoonover became one of the representative farmers of Putnam county, Ohio, where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred Oct. 11, 1895. His devoted wife passed away Jan. 6, following, and of their thirteen children all are living. Moses Schoonover was reared to maturity on the paternal homestead in Putnam county, Ohio, where he was afforded the advantages of the public schools. He continued to be associated in the work of the home farm until the death of his father, and about two years later, in 1897, he came to Lenawee county, where he was employed as a farm workman for the ensuing decade, at the expiration of which he was enabled to make judicious investment of his accumulated earnings, since, in 1907, he purchased of Charles Blanchard his present well improved farm of r6o acres. As an independent farmer he has manifested the same energy and enterprise which had made his labors as an employee prolific in benefit to himself and his employers, and the result is clearly shown in the appearance and appurtenances of his own farm, which is devoted to diversified agriculture, stock-growing and dairy farming. He makes a specialty of breeding of Holstein cattle, of which he has a fine herd of twenty-two at the time of this writing, and he also is a successful breeder of Duroc swine. He owns a threshing machine outfit of the most modern type, and in operation of the same he does a large and prosperous business each season. Though he has never sought nor desired public office he is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party and is loyal to all the duties and responsibili-ties of citizenship. March rg, igoi, bore record of the marriage of Mr. Schoonover to Miss Sarah Double, daughter of George Double, of Waldron, Hillsdale county, and they have six children, namely: Valta, Clifford, Harvey, James, Marie and Violet. Allen Peck merits recognition in this compilation by reason of his standing as one of the successful representatives of the agricultural industry in this county, as well, as for the reason that he is a citizen of sterling worth and one who enjoys uniform popularity in the community which has been his home during the major portion of his life. Mr. Peck is a native of the adjoining Ohio county of Fulton, where he was born, in Gorham township, Sept. 1g, i86o, and he is a son of John N. and Lois (Blood) Peck, the former of whom was born Nov. 7, 1826, in Vermont, and the latter May 26, 1829, in New Hampshire. Both families were early founded in New England, which was the generous and benificent cradle of much of our national history. John N. Peck immigrated to the West in 1851, and first located in Williams county, Ohio, where he remained about two years, at the expiration of which he removed to Gorham township, Fulton county, that state, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1865, when he came to Lenawee county and purchased a farm of eighty acres in Medina township. To the improvement and cultivation of this farm he continued to give his attention until 1876, when he sold the property and purchased his present well improved farm of eighty acres, in the same township, where he still maintains his home. He is one of the venerable pioneer citizens of the county and is eighty-three years of age at the time of,this writing, in 1gog. His cherished and devoted wife passed to the life eternal Sept. 18, x891. They became the-parents of three children-Laura, who is the wife of Leroy Van Auken, a farmer of Medina township; Gilman, who died in childhood; and Allen, who is the immediate subject of this sketch. John N. Peck is a man of sterling character, and upon the record of his long career as one of the world's noble army of workers, there rests no blemish. His life has been one of consecutive industry, and he gained success through his own well directed efforts. -He is well known throughout Lenawee county and also in Fulton county, Ohio, and he long held prestige as the champion sheep-shearer of this section. He is a Democrat in his political proclivities, and has been for many years a member of the Freewill Baptist Church, of which his wife also was a devoted member. Allen Peck, whose name initiates this paragraph, secured his early educational training in the district schools of Medina township, and from his boyhood days he contributed his quota to the work of the home farm, increasing his services as his ability and physical powers justified. Upon leaving the parental home he went to the lumbering district of the northern part of the state, where he found employment for about two years. He then returned to Lenawee county and purchased of Alonzo Bailey twenty acres of land in Medina township. To this he later added a contiguous tract of forty acres, so that he now has a farm of sixty acres, maintained under a high state of cultivation and equipped with excellent improvements, including a substantial residence and good barns, all of which were erected by him. In addition to the raising of the various crops adapted to the soil and climate Mr. Peck is a successful breeder of sheep and other live stock, and gives special attention to the dairy department of his farm enterprise. In politics he does not hold to strict partisan lines, but supports the measures and candidates approved by his judgment. He is affiliated with the Grange, the Gleaners and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he is one of the popular citizens of his township, where his circle of friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances. Mr. Peck has been twice married. On May 1, 1885, he wedded Miss Nellie Mumford, who was born and reared in this county and who was a daughter of Charles and Catherine '(Dagon) Mumford, of Medina township. Mrs. Peck was summoned to the life eternal Jan. i, igo4, and of her five children, all are living except Anna, the first-born. George, Edna, Lois and Lyman still remain at the paternal home. In May, Lgo6, Mr. Peck was united in marriage to Mrs. Ella Whaley, widow of Lucine Whaley and a daughter of Amos and Elizabeth Goodenberger, of Waldron, Hillsdale county, this state. Mrs. Peck has one daughter by her first marriage-Miss Georgia, who resides at the parental home, which is a center of gracious hospitality and a favored resort of the large circle of friends whom Mr. , and Mrs. Peck have gathered to them. Mrs. Peck's parents were early settlers of Hillsdale county. Ira A. Seeley is to be recognized in this work as one of the representative farmers and stock-growers of his native county, where he is the owner of a well improved farm of 12o acres, eligibly located in Medina township. He is a member of one of the sterling pioneer families of the county, which has represented his home from the time of his birth, and he has well upheld the honors of the name which he bears. He was born in Medina township, Oct. 2, 1847, and is a son of Alexander and Anne (Baggerley) Seeley, both of whom were born in the state of New York. The date of the father's nativity was 18o6, and he was reared to maturity in his native state, whence he came to Lenawee county shortly before the admission of the state to the Union. He first settled in Canandaigua, and later purchased 12o acres of heavily timbered land in Medina township, where. he instituted the reclamation of a farm, but he was not permitted long to continue his labors, since he died Nov. Lo, 1847, about one month after the birth of the subject of this review, who is the only child and who resides upon the old homestead secured by his father so many years ago. For a time Alexander Seeley was engaged in teaching in the pioneer schools of Medina township, and he was a man to whom was accorded the unqualified esteem of the con-inunity. IIe was a member of the Baptist church, as is also his widow, who still resides in this county, and who has attained to the venerable age of eighty-seven years. Ira A. Seeley gained his early educational discipline in the schools of the village of Morenci, and after attaining maturity he worked on the farm of his step-father until he had attained to the age of twenty-four years, when he returned to his father's old homestead of 12o acres, which he inherited. He has reclaimed his land and made upon the farm excellent improvements, including the erection of the present substantial buildings. He makes a specialty of the dairy department of his farm enterprise, and in this connection maintains a fine herd of Holstein cattle, of which he has an average of twenty-five head. He also raises other live stock of excellent grade and maintains his farm tinder a high state of cultivation. In politics Mr. Seeley is found arrayed as a staunch advocate of the principles of the Democratic party, but the only office which he has consented to fill is that of school director, of which he was incumbent for two years. He is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, in which he is affiliated with the aerie at Morenci. On Jan. 21, 1872, Mr. Seeley was united in marriage to Miss Hettie Boger, who was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, Nov. 8. 1851, and who is a daughter of David and Lavina (Shoemaker) Boger, both of whom were born in the eastern part of the Keystone State. Upon coming to the West Mr. Boger purchased a farm in Gorham township, Fulton county, Ohio, and there he developed a fine property, He continued to reside upon this homestead until about fifteen years before his death, and he passed the closing years of his life in the village of Morenci, where he and his wife both died, the latter on June 2, 1897. They were members of the Evangelist church and Mr. Boger was a Republican and affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. and Mrs. Seeley became the parents of three children-Jennie, who died Feb. 22, 1899; Lura, who .is the wife of Charles Cramer, a successful farmer of Medina township; and Erma, who is the wife of Leniuel McDonald, of Minneapolis. Minn. Alonzo Bailey is the owner of one of the valuable farms of Medina township, and he finds cause for gratification in that his homestead is that upgn which the major portion of his life has been passed, since his honored father purchased the same in 1844, since which time it has been transformed from a primitive pioneer farm to one that exemplifies the thrift and prosperity now marking this favored section of the state. Mr. Bailey is a native of Marion township, Marion county, Ohio, where he was born Feb. 6, 1842, and he is a son of Thomas and Lavina (Hayes) Bailey, the former of whom was born in Vermont, a member of a family founded in New England in the Colonial days, and the latter was horn in Ohio, where her parents were pioneer settlers. In 1844 Thomas Bailey came with his family to Lenawee county and settled in Medina township, where he purchased from Paul Raymond the farm of eighty acres now owned by his only surviving child, the subject of this review. He reclaimed much of the land from the forest, and became one of the successful farmers of the county. He continued to reside on the old homestead until his death, which occurred Feb. 15, i88o, and his wife preceded him to eternal rest by several years. Of the six children, Alonzo, of this sketch, was the fifth in order of birth and he is now the only one of the number living. The names of the deceased children are as follows: Eliza, Laura, David, Mary and Charles. Thomas Bailey was a Republican in politics and he served for some time in the office of pathmaster. He was a man of integrity and honor and ever commanded the respect of the community in which he maintained his home for so many years. Alonzo Bailey was a child of two years at the time of the family removal to Lenawee county, and he was reared to maturity on the farm which is now his home. His early educational advantages were those afforded in the district schools of Medina township, and he continued to be associated in the work and management of the home farm until he had attained to his legal majority, when he entered upon an apprenticeship at the trade of cooper, in which he became an expert artisan and to which he continued to give his attention for a period of three years. He then ' removed to Gratiot county, this state, where he purchased a farm of eighty acres, to whose cultivation he continued to give his attention until 1877, and in the meanwhile he was also engaged in the manufacturing of brick and tile. In the" year mentioned he disposed of his interests in Gratiot county and returned to Lenawee county, where he purchased his father's old homestead. Here he continued successfully in agricultural pursuits and he has made the best of improvements on the farm, including the erection of his present modern and attractive residence. Though he is now living essentially retired, he gives a general supervision to his farm, which is under the active control and management of his only son. The place is devoted to diversified agriculture and stock-growing, and the dairy department of the enterprise is made one of no minor importance. In politics Mr. Bailey gives his allegiance to the Republican party, and he is loyal and public-spirited as a citizen, taking much interest in local affairs. He served for seven years as director of his school district, and while a resident of Gratiot county he held the office of highway commissioner. He is a member of the Medina Grange, as is also his son, and to him is accorded the esteem and good will of the community in which he was reared and in which it has been his to attain a position of independence and definite pros-perity as one of the representative farmers of the county. On Feb. Ig, 1863, Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Frances E. Bartholomew, daughter of John and Susan (Hover) Bartholomew, of Medina township. Her parents were born in the state of New York, whence they came to Lenawee county in 1856. Mr. Bartholomew purchased land in Medina township, where he developed a good farm, and here he passed the residue of his life, secure in the esteem of all who knew him. He died at the venerable age of eighty-three years, and his wife survived him by several years. Both were zealous members of the Baptist church, and in politics he was a staunch advocate of the principles of the Republican party, with which he identified himself at the time of its organization. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey have two children-William H., who has active charge of the home farm; and Florence, who is the wife of William I. Miner, of Morenci, this county. Hervey A. Colvin ranked high among the sons of Lenawee county. He was born at Hudson, Mich., Oct. 21, 11841, and died March 31, 1885. His parents were Isaac and Elizabeth (Crane) Colvin, who were natives of New England. The mother was a daughter of the noted pioneer Crane family, who was among the first settlers of this county. Hervey A. Colvin attended the local schools and completed his. education at the Adrian High School. Beginning life on his own responsibility when a mere boy, he at first made his home with an uncle, who operated a saw mill, in Raisin township, and our subject lived with him until his fourteenth year, when he accepted a position iii the grocery store of K. S. Beals, where he remained for some years, thoroughly mastering the business. Later he accepted a clerkship in the Walby & Clay Bank, of Adrian, and was soon promoted to the position of cashier, which position he filled till Aug. 7, 1862, when he enlisted as corporal in Company C, Eighteenth Michigan infantry, with which he served until near the close of the war. Mr. Colvin was a model soldier, being promoted from time to time, and he was eventually transferred to the Twelfth Tennessee cavalry as captain. Later he was detailed to act as assistant adjutant-general on the staff of Gen. George Spalding, and in December, 1864, he was on the same detailed duty on Brigadier-General Hatch's staff, later on Major Stoneman's. He took an active part in all the battles of his regiment and was on the firing line and led the charge in the battle of Nashville, in which he was severely wounded in the arm. His service was marked for his bravery in the field, and prior to his discharge he was brevetted lieutenant-colonel for deeds of valor. After the close of the war Colonel Colvin returned to Adrian, and soon became a partner of K. S. Beals in the grocery business, the firm being known as Beals & Colvin-Mr. Beals being the same who had employed Mr. Colvin several years prior to the Civil war-and this partnership continued till the time of our subject's death. Mr. Colvin became interested in various enterprises of his city and was a director of the Lenawce County Savings Bank. In Masonry he attained great eminence, ranked as a Thirty-second degree member, and served his lodges in the various offices and was Captain of the Knights Templar. Also he was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically, he leas a staunch adherent of the principles and policies of the Republican party, but although often solicited he never aspired to hold any public office. Although possessing all the true requisites of a Christian he never united with any church, but his life was fraught with good deeds. On June Io, 1868, was celebrated his marriage to Miss Mary L. Stebbins, the daughter of Francis R. and Mary (Myer) Stebbins, the former a native of WWWilliamstown, Vt., and the latter of New York state. Francis R. Stebbins was born in 1818, and at the early age of twelve years took up life's battles on his own behalf and was apprenticed to a cabinet-maker at Montpelier, learning- the trade of his employer. From Montpelier he went to Buffalo, N. Y., where he followed his trade and also edited a newspaper. In 1836 he came to Palmyra, Mich., and remained in that village for five years, working at his trade there, and he came to Adrian in 1841. Here he was engaged. in the furniture business, being one of the first to open a business of the kind in the city, and he continued in this until his death, which occurred Sept. 30, 1892. A four-story brick block-one of the first erected in Adrian and for many years known as the "Stebbins Block"-was built by Mr. Stebbins and his brother. 'In connection with his furniture business he was employed, from 1850 to 186o, as editor of the old "Expositor," a Whig paper conducted by the Jermain Brothers. He took an. active interest in politics and served two years as alderman from the Second ward, and he was also a candidate for mayor. Worthy to note,. while running for this last named office, he positively refused to purchase any votes by treating or such other petty bribery practiced by the average candidate. Mr. Stebbins was one of the leading participants in the movement which resulted in the erection of the Soldiers' Monument in Adrian, and as a member of the school board he served on the building committee during the erection of the Central School building. He. was interested in several enterprises and was one of the original stockholders of the Illinois Brass Company, and also of the opera house. His wife, the mother of Mrs. Colvin, died April 16, 1852, when Mrs. Colvin was a small child, after which Mr. Stebbins was married to Sarah L. Briggs, of Claremont, N. H., who survived him until Jan. 29, 19o8. To his first marriage were born three children, two of whom reached maturity Francis Gilbert, who died Feb. 26, 1907, and Mrs. Colvin, wife of our subject. To Mr. Stebbins' second marriage were born three children, two of whom are living: Edwin J. and Frederick B., both of whom reside in Adrian, the former not being engaged in any vocation, the latter is in the real-estate business. Mr. and Mrs. Colvin became the parents of two children. William Beals, the eldest, born Sept. 13, 1872, was a man of exceptional ability and at the time of his death, Oct. 21, 1905, was assistant cashier of the Commercial Savings Bank. Socially he was a Mason of high rank and was eminent commander of the Knights Templar. The second child was Hervey A., Jr., born March 22, 1885, and at the present time he resides at Philadelphia. . Ile was but nine days old when his father died, but tinder the guiding care of a painstaking and loving mother, he grew to manhood equipped with every virtue essential to success. Passing through the local schools with high standing, he was graduated at the University of Michigan with the class of 1907, having followed the course of mechanical engineering. Mrs. Colvin takes great interest in public affairs and was the first woman to be elected to membership of any school board in the state of Michigan, serving nine years in that capacity in the city of Adrian. Franklin Gallup was long numbered among the representative citizens and successful farmers of Medina township, where practically his entire life was passed, and both as a man of sterling worth and as a member of one of the honored pioneer families of this county, it is fitting that a tribute to his memory be perpetuated in this volume. Mr. Gallup was born in Melbourne, province of Ontario, Canada, Sept. 24, 1828, and his death occurred on his fine old. homestead, in Medina township, May 18, 1goo. He was a son of Ezekiel and Parmelia Gallup, and his father came to Lenawee county in 1830, becoming one of the very earliest settlers in Medina township, where he secured a quarter section of government land, which he reclaimed from the forest wilds and which continued to be his home during the residue of his life. His wife also continued to reside on the old homestead until her death, and their names merit a place of honor on the roster of the sterling pioneers of this section of the state. They became the parents of ten children, all of whom are now deceased, and the names of whom are here entered: Ezekiel, Betsey, Abigail, Frederick, Parmelia Zelotes, William, Franklin; Elmer, and Nancy. Before the birth of the subject of this memoir his father had come to Lenawee county and established his pioneer home, and the son was quite young when he was brought to the primitive. log house on the old homestead. He was reared -tinder the influences and environments of the pioneer era and his early educational advantages were those afforded in the subscription schools maintained by the early settlers of Medina township. He continued to be associated in the work of the home farm until he initiated his independent career, and while still a young man he purchased 16o acres of the land which his father had secured from the government. To this he later added a contiguous tract of ninety acres in Wright township, Hillsdale county. He developed one of the valuable farms of this section of the state and continued to be actively concerned in the work and management of his homestead until about' five years prior to his death. He was a man of inviolable integrity and ordered his life upon a high plane of usefulness and honor, so that to him was ever given the high regard of all who knew him. He showed a commendable interest in all that made for the progress and general welfare of the community, was a stalwart supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and served for some time as director of his school district. He was affiliated with the Grange at Lime Creek, as is also his widow, and was a consistent member of the Congregational church, of which Mrs. Gallup also has long been a devout member. On Dec. 16, 1853, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gallup to Miss Eliza Spaulding, daughter of Lyman and Susan (Marshall). Spaulding, honored pioneers of this county, where they continued to maintain their home until their deaths.' They were natives of the state of New Hampshire and came to Lenawee county in 1849. They were members of the Congregational church, and the father' was a supporter of the cause of the Republican party from the time of its organization until his demise. Mr. and Mrs. Gallup became the parents of three children, concerning whom the following brief data are entered: Frank J. is a representative farmer of Wright township, Hillsdale county; Henrietta is the wife of Lem Spooner, a successful farmer of Medina township; and ' Edward H. remains with his widowed mother on the old homestead farm, of which he has charge. James H. Green, who is now living retired in the village of Jasper, is a member of a family which was founded in Lenawee county in the year following the admission of the state to the Union. He is a native of the county and here he has gained prestige as an extensive land owner and successful farmer. No citizen is held in higher esteem in his community and none is more worthy of this evidence of popularity and confidence. James Henry Green was born in Fairfield township, this county, Feb. 24, 1840, and is a son of James and Eliza (McConnell) Green, both natives of Ireland, where the former was born June 3, 18og, and the latter June 15, 1814. The father immigrated to the United States in 1831, and after passing a short period of time in the state of New York he made his way westward to Toledo, Ohio, where he secured employment on the canal which was then being constructed. In 1838 he took up his residence in Lenawee county, where he became one of the pioneer settlers of Fairfield township. He first purchased a tract of forty acres of land, and later he sold this property and purchased another place, of eighty acres, in the same township. He finally accumulated a homestead of 115. acres, and this he developed into one of the valuable farms of the county. During about the last decade of his life he lived retired from the active labors which had previously characterized his career and which had enabled him to gain a position of independence. He resided on the old home farm until his death, which occurred Sept. 27, 1888, and his widow, surviving him by nearly a score of years, likewise passed the closing days of her life do the homestead farm, which was endeared to her by the memories and associations of the past. She was summoned to the life eternal Nov. 12, 1905. Both were consistent members of the Christian church and their lives were marked by integrity, kindliness and usefulness. In politics the father originally gave his support to the Whig party, but he espoused the cause of the Republican party at the time of its organization and thereafter-gave to the same his unqualified allegiance. Of the ten children, Rachel, Jacob, Robert and William died in childhood; Eliza became the wife of Edwin Smith and is now deceased; James H., of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; Sylvester is a resident of Lyons, Ohio; Rachel S. is the wife of Richard Miller, of Vassar, Mich. ; William E. is a representative farmer of Fairfield township; and George is engaged in the mercantile business in Lyons, Ohio. James Henry Green is indebted to the pioneer schools of Fairfield township for his early educational training and he continued to be associated in, the work of the old home farm of his father until 1862, when, at the age of twentytwo years, the venturesome spirit of youth prompted him to go to the state of California, where he was identified with gold-mining enterprises until 1865, when he returned to his native county, after having been measurably successful in his western. ventures. Soon after his return to Lenawee county he purchased a farm of ioo acres in Fairfield township, and this tract he reclaimed from the forest. He made excellent improvements as the years passed and also added to the area of his landed estate in his native township, where he still owns 357 acres. He became known as one of the most energetic and progressive farmers of the township mentioned, and in earlier years he built tip a profitable enterprise in the buying and shipping of cattle, the major portion of which stock he sold in the city of Toledo. In connection with his farming interests, in 1886, Mr. Green built a cheese factory on his farm, and this he conducted very successfully for nearly fifteen years. In 1906 he removed from his farm to the village of jasper, where he purchased an attractive residence and where he has since lived essentially retired, though he continues to give a general supervision to his stock farm. As a citizen Mr. Green has ever shown a lively interest in all that has tended to conserve the progress and prosperity of his home county, and his political faith has been manifested in his stalwart support of the cause of the Republican party. He served as director of his school district for many years and for four years was an efficient incumbent of the office of justice. of the peace. He and his wife are zealous members of the Christian church, in which he held the offices of deacon and trustee for some time. He is affiliated with the jasper lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Grange of Fairfield township. Mrs. ' Green is likewise. identified with the Grange and is a prominent member of the Daughters of Rebekah, in which adjunct of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows she has held various offices, including that of noble grand, of which she is incumbent at the time this sketch is written. Mr. Green's reminiscences of the pioneer days in Lenawee county are most graphic and interesting, and not the least attractive of these is his description of the first school-house in which he was enrolled as' a pupil. This was a log cabin of the primitive type, equipped with puncheon floor, wide fireplace, and with basswood boards with 'peg legs to serve as seats and desks. This early "institution of learning" was in Fairfield township and was similar to the other schools maintained by the pioneers of Southern Michigan. On March 1, 1867, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Green to Miss Clarissa M. Salsbury, who was born and reared in this county, and who-is a daughter of Daniel C. and Margaret P. (Force) Salsbury, the former -of whom was born in the state of New York, and the latter in Lenaavee county, where her parents were numbered among the early settlers. Mr. Salsbury took up his residence in Fairfield township in 1840, and at the time of his death, in 1847, was living in Adrian, which was then a mere village. Mrs. Salsbury died in 1867.. They were members of the Christian church. Mr. and Mrs. Green became the parents of six children, all of whom are living except the first-born, Edwin E., who died in infancy, Oct. 3, 1870. Hartie E., born Dec. 10, 1871, is 'a successful farmer in Fairfield township, where he has charge of the old homestead farm of his father; he is married to Lena Wyman, daughter of Thomas Wyman, of Fairfield township. Florence C., born Jan. I, 1874, is the wife of William T. Day, of Weston, this county; James B., born March Ii, 1876, is engaged in the general merchandise business in the village of jasper; he is married to Blond Wyman, daughter of William Wyman, of Fairfield township. Bessie M., born Nov. 1g, 1879, is the wife of Granville Heffron, of Fairfield township. Bert H., born Nov. 15, 1886, was married on June 16, 1go9, to Miss Carlotta Hubbard, daughter of John Hubbard, of jasper village, and he has charge of sixty acres of his father's estate in Fairfield township. Jay R. Rogers, a prominent and influential farmer of the township of Medina, is a native of the Buckeye State. He first beheld the light of day in Erie county, Feb. 25, 1867, a son -of Richard H. and Elizabeth (Ray) Rogers. The father, also a native of Erie county, Ohio, and a farmer by occupation, came to Lenawee county in 1870, locating in Medina township, where he purchased loo acres of land from Samuel Perkins, one of the pioneer settlers of Medina. He resided on this farm for several years, but subsequently sold it and purchased another of zoo acres, upon which he made his home up to a few years ago, when he moved into the city of Hudson, where he now lives retired. In politics he is allied with the Republican party, but is an independent voter, believing in voting for the "best man." For several years he was a member of the school board in the district in which he resided and for five years he represented the township of Medina on the county board of Lenawee county. He belongs to the Baptist church and is a member of the Order of Grangers and the Masonic fraternity. He is the father of four surviving children-three sons and one daugh ter : Ernest, of Seneca township; Alexander R., a resident of Allen, Hillsdale county; Jay R., of this. sketch, and Daisy Alice, wife. of E. P. Farnsworth, of Port Huron, Mich.; and another son, Giles W., is deceased. Mrs. Richard H. Rogers passed away July 5, 19o6. The subject of this review acquired his education in the district schools of Medina township, the Hudson High School, and the Michigan Agricultural College at Lansing, and then returned to the parental farm in Medina, where he remained for two years. During the following seven years he taught school in the fall, winter and spring months and assisted his parents on the farm during the summer vacations. He passed the ensuing two or three years working on his father's place and in the year Igoo purchased 16o acres of land from his respected sire, launching forth in agricultural pursuits for himself. He has been very successful as a farmer and 'today is making a specialty of breeding and raising Double Standard, Polled Durham and Short I-Torn cattle, American trotting horses. bred for carriage purposes, Shropshire sheep and fancy Plymouth Rock poultry. In politics he is affiliated with the Republican party and for five years was chosen by the electors of Medina township to perform the duties of the office of township clerk; and for a similar period of time he was school director in the district in which he lives. Mr.'Rogers belongs to the Patrons of Husbandry, commonly termed the Grange, and is also a member of the fraternal order of the Knights of the Maccabees. On March 24, 1892, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Baggarley, daughter of John M. and Laura McDaniels Baggarley, of Canandaigua, of which happy marital union have been born two children-Richard 14. and Josephine Alice, both of whom reside with their parents. Fayette C. Youngs, who is now living virtually retired on his fine homestead farm, nearly all of which lies within the corporate limits of the village of Morenci, was long numbered among the most progressive farmers and stock-growers of the county, where he has maintained his home from the days of his infancy and where he stands as a scion of one of the honored pioneer families of this favored section of the Wolverine State. Fayette Cameron Youngs, was born in the state of Pennsylvania, Aug. 9, 1843, and is a son of Sylvester and Angeline (Coleman) Youngs, who likewise were natives of the old Keystone State, where the respective families were early founded. In 1844 Sylvester Youngs came with his family to Michigan and made Lenawee county his destination. Soon after his arrival he purchased a partially improved farm in Seneca township, where he developed the same into a valuable property, and where he and his wife continued to reside until their deaths. They were folk of honest worth, industrious and God-fearing, and were ever held in high esteem in the community, to whose advancement and material development they contributed their quota. In politics the father was an old-line Whig, and he and his wife were attendants of the Methodist church. They became the parents of five children, namely: Rhoda E., who is the widow of Theodore Layton, and who resides in the city of Coldwater, Branch county; Fayette C., who is the immediate subject of this review; William H., who is deceased; Coleman, who resides in the city of Adrian, this county, and Albertina, who is deceased. Fayette C. Youngs was an infant at the time of the family removal to Lenawee county, and he was reared to manhood on the [ionic farm. His educational training was secured in the schools of the village of 'Morenci, and he continued to assist in the work of his father's farm until he purchased the homestead of 16o acres, one half of which lies in Seneca township and the remainder in Gorham township, Fulton county, Ohio. All but ten acres of the Seneca township half of his landed estate is-included within the corporate limits of the village of Morenci, and this fact adds materially to the value of the property. Mr. Youngs cleared much of the land and brought it under effective cultivation, the while he maintained the portion previously reclaimed at the highest standard of productiveness, through the proper care of the soil, in the rotation of crops and the use of effective fertilizers when demanded. His farm is devoted to general agriculture and to the raising of high-grade live stock, and he maintains a general supervision of the place, though he has lived essentially retired for the past several years. In politics Mr. Youngs maintains an, independent attitude, giving his support to the men and measures meeting the approval of his judgment, and he has never had aught of desire for the honors or emoluments of public office. He is identified with the Grange of Seneca township, and has taken an active interest in its affairs. On May 7, 1867, Mr. Youngs was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Gillis, daughter of Ezra W. and Emily (Garlick) Gillis, of Morenci. Her parents were natives of the state of New York, whence they came to Michigan in 1852 and located in the village of Morenci. Orie year later they removed to Utica, Ohio, where Mr. Gillis followed the trade of carpenter for some time. He then returned to Morenci, where he engaged in the operation of a flour mill, and here he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 19o2. He was a Republican in politics, a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and held membership in the Universalist church, of which his widow, who still resides in Morenci, is also a member. Mr. and Mrs. Youngs became the parents of four children, concerning whom the following brief record is given: Orion DeWitt is identified with the operation of a creamery in Pittsburg, Pa.; Grace Eloise is the wife of Burton E. Bowman, of Upper Sandusky, Ohio; Sylvester Arlington is identified with business interests in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, and Elmer died in infancy. Ward N. Cady, an influential and well-to-do farmer and dairyman of the township of Seneca, is a native of Hillsdale county, Michigan, born Feb. 27, 1850. His father, Joel L. Cady, a native of Rochester, N. Y., came to Lenawee county many years ago and for a number of years conducted a hotel in what is today the city, of Hudson. Later he removed to Wright township, Hillsdale Bounty, where he purchased a farm, upon which he continued to reside up to the time of his demise, Sept. 17, 1887. The mother of the subject of this record, Margaret (Wilson) Cady, was also born at Rochester, N. Y., where her marriage to Mr. Cady occurred, and she passed away in 1899. There were four children in the family Clark, of Hillsdale county; Earl, of Chicago; Lavina, the wife of Fenton Coleman, and Ward N., of this review. The father was ever an active member of the Republican party and at various times was the incumbent of several township offices while a resident of Hillsdale county, and he and his wife belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. Ward N. Cady received his schooling in the district schools of Wright township, dividing his time between his father's farm and the school room. Upon leaving school he continued to work for his father and later leased the farm, which he operated for a period of two years. He then purchased a farm in Hillsdale county, but after having conducted it for a few years, sold out and removed to Lenawee county, locating in Seneca township, where he purchased 105 acres of land, which, with sixty acres acquired in later years, comprises the acreage of his present farm. Since he took possession of the place he has removed much of the undergrowth and timber, increased the productiveness of the soil, enlarged and improved the older buildings and recently erected the modernly equipped and commodious barn which now adorns the farm. Besides doing general farming he operates a fine dairy and is interested in the breeding and raising of stock of various varieties. Politically he is not affiliated with any political party, believing in casting his ballot independently of any party organization, and though he has not acquired the habit of seeking public office, he has for several years been pathmaster in his township, being interested in the construction and maintenance of durable and substantial public highways. On May 4, 1871, he was united in holy matrimony to Miss Rachael Carpenter, daughter of George and Jane (McLaughlin) Carpenter, who for many years resided on a farm in Wright township, Hillsdale county. The former was a native of New York state and the mother's people came from Pennsylvania. Both are deceased. But one child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cady-George, a merchant of Weston.

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History of Lenawee County
published by The Western Historical Society in 1909. Book 1
Book 2

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